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The spatial economy : cities, regions and international trade / Masahisa Fujita, Paul Krugman, Anthony J. Venables.

By: Fujita, Masahisa.
Contributor(s): Krugman, Paul R | Venables, Anthony.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookCambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, 2001. c1999Description: xiii, 367 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780262561471 (pbk.).Subject(s): Economic geography | Space in economics | Urban economics | Regional economics | International tradeDDC classification: 330.9 FUJ Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
The Rediscovery of Geography Linkages and Circular Causation Modeling Tricks: Dixit-Stiglitz, Icebergs, Evolution, and the Computer Some Intellectual Background Antecedents I: Urban Economics The von Thunen Model Explaining Cities: External Economies Urban Systems Multiple Subcenters Uses and Limits of Traditional Urban Economics Antecedents II: Regional Science Central-Place Theory Base-Multiplier Analysis Market Potential Analysis Limitations of Regional Science A Brief Introduction to Bifurcations Labor Mobility and Regional Development The Dixit-Stiglitz Model of Monopolistic Competition and Its Spatial Implications Consumer Behavior Multiple Locations and Transport Costs Producer Behavior Some Normalizations The Price Index Effect and the Home Market Effect The "No-Black-Hole" Condition Core and Periphery Instantaneous Equilibrium The Core-Periphery Model: Statement and Numerical Examples When Is a Core-Periphery Pattern Sustainable? When is the Symmetric Equilibrium Broken? Implications and Conclusions Symmetry Breaking Many Regions and Continuous Space The Three-Region Case The Racetrack Economy The Turing Approach The Growth Rate of a Fluctuation Determining the Preferred Frequency: The Large Economy From Local to Global Simulation Parameters Agricultural Transport Costs Trade Costs: The Realities Trade Costs: The Model Core-Periphery or Symmetry? Differentiated Agricultural Products. 1. Introduction I. Some Intellectual Background. 2. Antecedents I: Urban Economics. 3. Antecedents II: Regional Science II. Labor Mobility and Regional Development. 4. The Dixit-Stiglitz Model of Monopolistic Competition and Its Spatial Implications. 5. Core and Periphery. 6. Many Regions and Continuous Space. 7. Agricultural Transport Costs III. The Urban System. 8. Spatial Models of Urban Systems: A Heuristic Introduction. 9. The Monocentric Economy. 10. The Emergence of New Cities. 11. Evolution of a Hierarchical Urban System. 12. An Empirical Digression: The Sizes of Cities. 13. Ports, Transportation Hubs, and City Location IV. International Trade. 14. International Specialization. 15. Economic Development and the Spread of Industry. 16. Industrial Clustering. 17. A Seamless World. 18. External Trade and Internal Geography. 19. The Way Forward.
Summary: The authors show how a common approach that emphasizes the three-way interaction among increasing returns, transportation costs, and the movement of productive factors can be applied to a wide range of issues in urban, regional, and international economics.
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Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
330.9 FUJ 009986 (Browse shelf) Available 009986

Includes bibliographical references (p. [351]-356) and index.

The Rediscovery of Geography
Linkages and Circular Causation
Modeling Tricks: Dixit-Stiglitz, Icebergs, Evolution, and the Computer
Some Intellectual Background
Antecedents I: Urban Economics
The von Thunen Model
Explaining Cities: External Economies
Urban Systems
Multiple Subcenters
Uses and Limits of Traditional Urban Economics
Antecedents II: Regional Science
Central-Place Theory
Base-Multiplier Analysis
Market Potential Analysis
Limitations of Regional Science
A Brief Introduction to Bifurcations
Labor Mobility and Regional Development
The Dixit-Stiglitz Model of Monopolistic Competition and Its Spatial Implications
Consumer Behavior
Multiple Locations and Transport Costs
Producer Behavior
Some Normalizations
The Price Index Effect and the Home Market Effect
The "No-Black-Hole" Condition
Core and Periphery
Instantaneous Equilibrium
The Core-Periphery Model: Statement and Numerical Examples
When Is a Core-Periphery Pattern Sustainable?
When is the Symmetric Equilibrium Broken?
Implications and Conclusions
Symmetry Breaking
Many Regions and Continuous Space
The Three-Region Case
The Racetrack Economy
The Turing Approach
The Growth Rate of a Fluctuation
Determining the Preferred Frequency: The Large Economy
From Local to Global
Simulation Parameters
Agricultural Transport Costs
Trade Costs: The Realities
Trade Costs: The Model
Core-Periphery or Symmetry?
Differentiated Agricultural Products.
1. Introduction
I. Some Intellectual Background. 2. Antecedents I: Urban Economics. 3. Antecedents II: Regional Science
II. Labor Mobility and Regional Development. 4. The Dixit-Stiglitz Model of Monopolistic Competition and Its Spatial Implications. 5. Core and Periphery. 6. Many Regions and Continuous Space. 7. Agricultural Transport Costs
III. The Urban System. 8. Spatial Models of Urban Systems: A Heuristic Introduction. 9. The Monocentric Economy. 10. The Emergence of New Cities. 11. Evolution of a Hierarchical Urban System. 12. An Empirical Digression: The Sizes of Cities. 13. Ports, Transportation Hubs, and City Location
IV. International Trade. 14. International Specialization. 15. Economic Development and the Spread of Industry. 16. Industrial Clustering. 17. A Seamless World. 18. External Trade and Internal Geography. 19. The Way Forward.

The authors show how a common approach that emphasizes the three-way interaction among increasing returns, transportation costs, and the movement of productive factors can be applied to a wide range of issues in urban, regional, and international economics.

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