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Exploring institutional change : the contribution of co-production to shaping institutions / Wayne Shand.

Contributor(s): IIED (London).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Human Settlements Working Paper. London : IIED, 2015Description: 27 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781784312770 (pbk.).Subject(s): Organizational innovation | Institutional economics | Organizational change | Economic developmentDDC classification: 302.35 SHA Online resources: For the full text click here: Summary: The importance of effective institutions for development is well established. There is however, a continuing debate on how to stimulate institutional reform within highly complex political and cultural contexts. This working paper explores sociological theories of institutional change to consider how service co-production, involving organised communities and state agencies, can influence the systems of rules and behaviours that underpin urban governance. Using examples of co-production in Harare, the paper highlights how the cumulative impact of joint activity has generated small-scale adaptations in the institutionalised practices of public administration – creating spaces of engagement and negotiation leading to incremental institutional change.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
302.35 SHA 007978 (Browse shelf) Available 007978

Includes bibliographical references.

The importance of effective institutions for development is well established. There is however, a continuing debate on how to stimulate institutional reform within highly complex political and cultural contexts.

This working paper explores sociological theories of institutional change to consider how service co-production, involving organised communities and state agencies, can influence the systems of rules and behaviours that underpin urban governance. Using examples of co-production in Harare, the paper highlights how the cumulative impact of joint activity has generated small-scale adaptations in the institutionalised practices of public administration – creating spaces of engagement and negotiation leading to incremental institutional change.

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