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Gandhinagar : building national identity in postcolonial India / Ravi Kalia.

By: Kalia, Ravi.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Delhi : Oxford University Press, 2004Description: xiv, 165 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0195676084 (hbk.); 9780195676082 (hbk.).Subject(s): City planning -- India -- Gāndhīnagar | Urban policy -- India | Gāndhīnagar (India) -- Social conditionsDDC classification: 307.1216095475 KAL Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
The making of the Gujarat state -- The politics of site -- The Kahn seminar in Ahmedabad -- The plan and architecture.
Summary: "Exploring the impact of modernist architecture on India as a whole, Kalia suggests that the style gained acceptance because its parsimonious designs and unadorned spaces never represented a threat to a religiously pluralist country anxious to create a secular identity. He explains how two competing versions of Indian history and ideology - Gandhi's and Jawaharlal Nehru's - employed modernism's ideals for their own separate ends. Serving two masters, as Kalia illustrates, created constrictions and tensions evident in the building of Gandhinagar and in the careers of many Indian architects, including Doshi, Charles Correa, and Achyut Kanvinde."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
307.1216095475 KAL 000736 (Browse shelf) Available 000736

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The making of the Gujarat state -- The politics of site -- The Kahn seminar in Ahmedabad -- The plan and architecture.

"Exploring the impact of modernist architecture on India as a whole, Kalia suggests that the style gained acceptance because its parsimonious designs and unadorned spaces never represented a threat to a religiously pluralist country anxious to create a secular identity. He explains how two competing versions of Indian history and ideology - Gandhi's and Jawaharlal Nehru's - employed modernism's ideals for their own separate ends. Serving two masters, as Kalia illustrates, created constrictions and tensions evident in the building of Gandhinagar and in the careers of many Indian architects, including Doshi, Charles Correa, and Achyut Kanvinde."--BOOK JACKET.

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