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In the public interest : evictions, citizenship and inequality in contemporary Delhi / Gautam Bhan.

By: Bhan, Gautam, 1980- [author. ].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Delhi : Orient Blackswan Pvt. Ltd, 2016Description: xiv, 290 p. : ill., (black & white), maps (black & white) ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9788125062325 (hbk.).Subject(s): Internally displaced persons -- India -- Delhi -- Social conditions | Internally displaced persons -- India -- Delhi -- Economic conditions | Evictions -- 1990-2007 -- India -- DelhiDDC classification: 362.87095456 BHA
Contents:
List of Boxes, Figures and Maps -- Publisher’s Acknowledgements -- Introduction: ‘How did we get here?’ -- 1. Planned Illegalities: The Production of Housing in Delhi, 1947–2010 -- 2. Planned Development and/as Crisis: Evictions and the Politics of Governance in Contemporary Delhi -- 3. Unmaking Citizens: Spatial Illegality, Urban Citizenship and the Challenges for Inclusive Politics -- 4. ‘You can’t just walk into a Court’: Notes on the Judicialisation of Resistance -- Concluding Provocations: Inquiries from the South -- References -- Acknowledgements -- Index
Summary: Like many cities in the global South, New Delhi has not been built by architects, engineers or planners, but by residents themselves. One form of such auto-construction is the basti—an urban settlement that houses income-poor residents. A basti marks years of an urban life, built slowly and incrementally. It is more than a ‘slum’—it is a claim to development and citizenship. In the moment of the basti’s eviction, this claim is erased, signifying a closure for the political, legal, social and economic negotiations that allowed a vulnerable citizenry to settle and survive for decades. Contemporary Delhi is a city scarred by the evictions of bastis. Ironically, many of these evictions were ordered in Public Interest Litigations by the Indian Judiciary. How did a judicial innovation introduced precisely to enable the marginalised to seek justice become an instrument of their exclusion? Drawing on an archive of court cases that resulted in evictions in Delhi from 1990 to 2007 as well as ethnographic research with basti residents and social movements resisting eviction, In the Public’s Interest shows how evictions have been fundamental to how urban space is been structured and produced, and asks what they tell us about the contemporary Indian city. Students and scholars of sociology, urban studies, development studies and geography will find this book engaging and useful.
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Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
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Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
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362.87095456 BHA 008046 (Browse shelf) Checked out Not For Loan 19/10/2020 008046
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
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362.87095456 BHA 008041 (Browse shelf) Not For Loan 008041
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, New Delhi
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362.87095456 BHA 008042 (Browse shelf) Not For Loan 008042
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
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Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
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Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
362.87095456 BHA 008045 (Browse shelf) Not For Loan 008045

Includes bibliographical references and index.

List of Boxes, Figures and Maps -- Publisher’s Acknowledgements -- Introduction: ‘How did we get here?’ -- 1. Planned Illegalities: The Production of Housing in Delhi, 1947–2010 -- 2. Planned Development and/as Crisis: Evictions and the Politics of Governance in Contemporary Delhi -- 3. Unmaking Citizens: Spatial Illegality, Urban Citizenship and the Challenges for Inclusive Politics -- 4. ‘You can’t just walk into a Court’: Notes on the Judicialisation of Resistance -- Concluding Provocations: Inquiries from the South -- References -- Acknowledgements -- Index

Like many cities in the global South, New Delhi has not been built by architects, engineers or planners, but by residents themselves. One form of such auto-construction is the basti—an urban settlement that houses income-poor residents. A basti marks years of an urban life, built slowly and incrementally. It is more than a ‘slum’—it is a claim to development and citizenship. In the moment of the basti’s eviction, this claim is erased, signifying a closure for the political, legal, social and economic negotiations that allowed a vulnerable citizenry to settle and survive for decades.
Contemporary Delhi is a city scarred by the evictions of bastis. Ironically, many of these evictions were ordered in Public Interest Litigations by the Indian Judiciary. How did a judicial innovation introduced precisely to enable the marginalised to seek justice become an instrument of their exclusion? Drawing on an archive of court cases that resulted in evictions in Delhi from 1990 to 2007 as well as ethnographic research with basti residents and social movements resisting eviction, In the Public’s Interest shows how evictions have been fundamental to how urban space is been structured and produced, and asks what they tell us about the contemporary Indian city.
Students and scholars of sociology, urban studies, development studies and geography will find this book engaging and useful.

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