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Designing and conducting mixed methods research / John W. Creswell, Vicki L. Plano Clark.

By: Creswell, John W [author.].
Contributor(s): Plano Clark, Vicki L [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Thousand Oaks, CA : Sage Publications, c2011Edition: 2nd edition.Description: xxvi, 457 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781412975179 (pbk.); 1412975174 (pbk.).Subject(s): Social sciences -- Research -- Methodology | Research -- EvaluationDDC classification: 001.42 CRE Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
The Nature of Mixed Methods Research -- Defining Mixed Methods Research -- Examples of Mixed Methods Studies -- What Research Problems Fit Mixed Methods? -- A Need Exists Because One Data Source May Be Insufficient -- A Need Exists to Explain Initial Results -- A Need Exists to Generalize Exploratory Findings -- A Need Exists to Enhance a Study With a Second Method -- A Need Exists to Best Employ a Theoretical Stance -- A Need Exists to Understand a Research Objective Through Multiple Research Phases -- What Are the Advantages of Using Mixed Methods? -- What Are the Challenges in Using Mixed Methods? -- The Question of Skills -- The Question of Time and Resources -- The Question of Convincing Others -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- The Foundations of Mixed Methods Research -- Historical Foundations -- When Did Mixed Methods Begin? -- Why Mixed Methods Emerged -- The Development of the Name -- Stages in the Evolution of Mixed Methods -- Formative period -- Paradigm debate period -- Procedural development period -- Advocacy and expansion period -- Reflective period -- Philosophical Foundations -- Philosophy and Worldviews -- Worldviews Applied to Mixed Methods -- One "best" worldview for mixed methods -- Multiple worldviews in mixed methods -- Worldviews relate to the type of mixed methods design -- Worldviews depend on the scholarly community -- Theoretical Foundations -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Choosing a Mixed Methods Design -- Principles for Designing a Mixed Methods Study -- Recognize That Mixed Methods Designs Can Be Fixed and/or Emergent -- Identify an Approach to Design -- Match the Design to the Research Problem, Purpose, and Questions -- Be Explicit About the Reasons for Mixing Methods -- Key Decisions in Choosing a Mixed Methods Design -- Determine the Level of Interaction Between the Quantitative and Qualitative Strands -- Determine the Priority of the Quantitative and Qualitative Strands -- Determine the Timing of the Quantitative and Qualitative Strands -- Determine Where and How to Mix the Quantitative and Qualitative Strands -- The Major Mixed Methods Designs -- Prototypes of the Major Designs -- The Convergent Parallel Design -- The purpose of the convergent design -- When to choose the convergent design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the convergent design -- The convergent design procedures -- Strengths of the convergent design -- Challenges in using the convergent design -- Convergent design variants -- The Explanatory Sequential Design -- The purpose of the explanatory design -- When to choose the explanatory design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the explanatory design -- The explanatory design procedures -- Strengths of the explanatory design -- Challenges in using the explanatory design -- Explanatory design variants -- The Exploratory Sequential Design -- The purpose of the exploratory design -- When to choose the exploratory design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the exploratory design -- The exploratory design procedures -- Strengths of the exploratory design -- Challenges in using the exploratory design -- Exploratory design variants -- The Embedded Design -- The purpose of the embedded design -- When to choose the embedded design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the embedded design -- The embedded design procedures -- Strengths of the embedded design -- Challenges in using the embedded design -- Embedded design variants -- The Transformative Design -- The purpose of the transformative design -- When to choose the transformative design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the transformative design -- The transformative design procedures -- Strengths of the transformative design -- Challenges in using the transformative design -- Transformative design variants -- The Multiphase Design -- The purpose of the multiphase design -- When to choose the multiphase design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the multiphase design -- The multiphase design procedures -- Strengths of the multiphase design -- Challenges in using the multiphase design -- Multiphase design variants -- A Model for Describing a Design in a Written Report -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Examples of Mixed Methods Designs -- Learning From Examples of Mixed Methods Research -- Using Tools to Describe Mixed Methods Designs -- A Notation System -- Procedural Diagrams -- Examining the Design Features of Mixed Methods Studies -- Six Examples of Mixed Methods Designs -- An Example of the Convergent Parallel Design (Wittink, Barg, & Gallo, 2006) -- An Example of the Explanatory Sequential Design (Ivankova & Stick, 2007) -- An Example of the Exploratory Sequential Design (Myers & Oetzel, 2003) -- An Example of the Embedded Design (Brady & O'Regan, 2009) -- An Example of the Transformative Design (Hodgkin, 2008) -- An Example of the Multiphase Design (Nastasi et al., 2007) -- Similarities and Differences Among the Sample Studies -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Introducing a Mixed Methods Study -- Writing a Mixed Methods Title -- Qualitative and Quantitative Titles -- Mixed Methods Titles -- Stating the Research Problem in the Introduction -- Topics in a Statement of the Problem Section -- Integrate Mixed Methods Into the Statement of the Problem -- Developing the Purpose Statement -- Qualitative and Quantitative Purpose Statements -- Mixed Methods Purpose Statements -- Writing Research Questions and Hypotheses -- Qualitative Questions and Quantitative Questions and Hypotheses -- Mixed Methods Research Questions -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Collecting Data in Mixed Methods Research -- Procedures in Collecting Qualitative and Quantitative Data -- Using Sampling Procedures -- Gaining Permissions -- Collecting Information -- Recording the Data -- Administering the Procedures -- Data Collection in Mixed Methods -- Convergent Design -- Decide whether the two samples will include different or the same individuals -- Decide whether the size of the two samples will be the same or different -- Decide to design parallel data collection questions -- Decide if the data will be collected on two, independent sources or a single source -- Explanatory Design -- Decide whether to use the same or different individuals in both samples -- Decide on the sizes for the two samples -- Decide what quantitative results to follow up -- Decide how to select the best participants for the qualitative follow-up phase -- Decide how to describe the emerging follow-up phase for institutional review board approval -- Exploratory Design -- Decide who and how many individuals to include in the sample for the quantitative phase -- Decide how to describe the emerging follow-up phase for institutional review board approval -- Decide what aspects of the qualitative results to use to inform the quantitative data collection -- Decide what steps to take in developing a good quantitative instrument -- Decide how to convey the instrument development component in a procedural diagram -- Embedded Design -- Decide the reason and timing for embedding a second type of data within a larger design -- Decide whether the issue of introducing bias within an embedded experiment is a concern -- Decide what approach will provide the design or procedure for collecting quantitative and qualitative data -- Decide what data collection issues can be anticipated within the chosen design or procedure -- Transformative Design -- Decide how best to refer to and interact with participants -- Decide what sampling strategies will promote inclusiveness --
Decide how to actively involve participants in the data collection process -- Decide to use instruments that are sensitive to the cultural context of the group being studied -- Decide how the data collection process and outcomes will benefit the community being studied -- Multiphase Design -- Decide to use multiple sampling strategies -- Decide how to sample and collect data for each phase -- Decide how to handle measurement and attrition issues -- Decide on the programmatic thrust to provide the framework for the multiphase projects -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Analyzing and Interpreting Data in Mixed Methods Research -- The Basics of Quantitative and Qualitative Data Analysis and Interpretation -- Preparing the Data for Analysis -- Exploring the Data -- Analyzing the Data -- Representing the Data Analysis -- Interpreting the Results -- Validating the Data and Results -- Data Analysis and Interpretation Within Mixed Methods Designs -- Steps and Key Decisions in Data Analysis for Each Mixed Methods Design -- Decisions for Merged Data Analysis in a Concurrent Approach -- Strategies for comparing results -- Strategies for interpreting merged results and reconciling differences -- Decisions for Connected Data Analysis in a Sequential Approach -- Strategies for connected data analysis -- Strategies for interpreting connected results -- Validation and Mixed Methods Designs -- Software Applications and Mixed Methods Data Analysis -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Writing and Evaluating Mixed Methods Research -- General Guidelines for Writing -- Relate the Structure to the Mixed Methods Design -- Structure of a Proposal for a Mixed Methods Dissertation or Thesis -- Structure of a Mixed Methods Dissertation or Thesis -- Structure for a National Institutes of Health Proposal -- Structure of a Mixed Methods Journal Article -- Evaluating a Mixed Methods Study -- Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluation Criteria -- Mixed Methods Evaluation Criteria -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Summary and Recommendations -- On Writing a Methodological Paper -- On Defining Mixed Methods -- On Using Terms -- On Using Philosophy -- On Designing Procedures -- On the Value Added by Mixed Methods -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- An Example of the Convergent Parallel Design (Wittink, Barg, & Gallo, 2006) -- An Example of the Explanatory Sequential Design (Ivankova & Stick, 2007) -- An Example of the Exploratory Sequential Design (Myers & Oetzel, 2003) -- An Example of the Embedded Design (Brady & O'Regan, 2009) -- An Example of the Transformative Design (Hodgkin, 2008) -- An Example of the Multiphase Design (Nastasi et al., 2007).
Summary: "Combining the latest thinking about mixed methods research designs with practical, step-by-step guidance, the Second Edition of Designing and Conducting Mixed Methods Research now covers six major mixed methods designs. Authors John W. Creswell and Vicki L. Plano Clark walk readers through the entire research process, from formulating questions to designing, collecting data, and interpreting results and include updated examples from published mixed methods studies drawn from the social, behavioral, health, and education disciplines."--Pub. desc.
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Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
001.42 CRE 007538 (Browse shelf) Available 007538

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Chapter 1. The Nature of Mixed Methods Research -- Defining Mixed Methods Research -- Examples of Mixed Methods Studies -- What Research Problems Fit Mixed Methods? -- A Need Exists Because One Data Source May Be Insufficient -- A Need Exists to Explain Initial Results -- A Need Exists to Generalize Exploratory Findings -- A Need Exists to Enhance a Study With a Second Method -- A Need Exists to Best Employ a Theoretical Stance -- A Need Exists to Understand a Research Objective Through Multiple Research Phases -- What Are the Advantages of Using Mixed Methods? -- What Are the Challenges in Using Mixed Methods? -- The Question of Skills -- The Question of Time and Resources -- The Question of Convincing Others -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Chapter 2. The Foundations of Mixed Methods Research -- Historical Foundations -- When Did Mixed Methods Begin? -- Why Mixed Methods Emerged -- The Development of the Name -- Stages in the Evolution of Mixed Methods -- Formative period -- Paradigm debate period -- Procedural development period -- Advocacy and expansion period -- Reflective period -- Philosophical Foundations -- Philosophy and Worldviews -- Worldviews Applied to Mixed Methods -- One "best" worldview for mixed methods -- Multiple worldviews in mixed methods -- Worldviews relate to the type of mixed methods design -- Worldviews depend on the scholarly community -- Theoretical Foundations -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Chapter 3. Choosing a Mixed Methods Design -- Principles for Designing a Mixed Methods Study -- Recognize That Mixed Methods Designs Can Be Fixed and/or Emergent -- Identify an Approach to Design -- Match the Design to the Research Problem, Purpose, and Questions -- Be Explicit About the Reasons for Mixing Methods -- Key Decisions in Choosing a Mixed Methods Design -- Determine the Level of Interaction Between the Quantitative and Qualitative Strands -- Determine the Priority of the Quantitative and Qualitative Strands -- Determine the Timing of the Quantitative and Qualitative Strands -- Determine Where and How to Mix the Quantitative and Qualitative Strands -- The Major Mixed Methods Designs -- Prototypes of the Major Designs -- The Convergent Parallel Design -- The purpose of the convergent design -- When to choose the convergent design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the convergent design -- The convergent design procedures -- Strengths of the convergent design -- Challenges in using the convergent design -- Convergent design variants -- The Explanatory Sequential Design -- The purpose of the explanatory design -- When to choose the explanatory design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the explanatory design -- The explanatory design procedures -- Strengths of the explanatory design -- Challenges in using the explanatory design -- Explanatory design variants -- The Exploratory Sequential Design -- The purpose of the exploratory design -- When to choose the exploratory design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the exploratory design -- The exploratory design procedures -- Strengths of the exploratory design -- Challenges in using the exploratory design -- Exploratory design variants -- The Embedded Design -- The purpose of the embedded design -- When to choose the embedded design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the embedded design -- The embedded design procedures -- Strengths of the embedded design -- Challenges in using the embedded design -- Embedded design variants -- The Transformative Design -- The purpose of the transformative design -- When to choose the transformative design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the transformative design -- The transformative design procedures -- Strengths of the transformative design -- Challenges in using the transformative design -- Transformative design variants -- The Multiphase Design -- The purpose of the multiphase design -- When to choose the multiphase design -- Philosophical assumptions behind the multiphase design -- The multiphase design procedures -- Strengths of the multiphase design -- Challenges in using the multiphase design -- Multiphase design variants -- A Model for Describing a Design in a Written Report -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Chapter 4. Examples of Mixed Methods Designs -- Learning From Examples of Mixed Methods Research -- Using Tools to Describe Mixed Methods Designs -- A Notation System -- Procedural Diagrams -- Examining the Design Features of Mixed Methods Studies -- Six Examples of Mixed Methods Designs -- Study A. An Example of the Convergent Parallel Design (Wittink, Barg, & Gallo, 2006) -- Study B. An Example of the Explanatory Sequential Design (Ivankova & Stick, 2007) -- Study C. An Example of the Exploratory Sequential Design (Myers & Oetzel, 2003) -- Study D. An Example of the Embedded Design (Brady & O'Regan, 2009) -- Study E. An Example of the Transformative Design (Hodgkin, 2008) -- Study F. An Example of the Multiphase Design (Nastasi et al., 2007) -- Similarities and Differences Among the Sample Studies -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Chapter 5. Introducing a Mixed Methods Study -- Writing a Mixed Methods Title -- Qualitative and Quantitative Titles -- Mixed Methods Titles -- Stating the Research Problem in the Introduction -- Topics in a Statement of the Problem Section -- Integrate Mixed Methods Into the Statement of the Problem -- Developing the Purpose Statement -- Qualitative and Quantitative Purpose Statements -- Mixed Methods Purpose Statements -- Writing Research Questions and Hypotheses -- Qualitative Questions and Quantitative Questions and Hypotheses -- Mixed Methods Research Questions -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Chapter 6. Collecting Data in Mixed Methods Research -- Procedures in Collecting Qualitative and Quantitative Data -- Using Sampling Procedures -- Gaining Permissions -- Collecting Information -- Recording the Data -- Administering the Procedures -- Data Collection in Mixed Methods -- Convergent Design -- Decide whether the two samples will include different or the same individuals -- Decide whether the size of the two samples will be the same or different -- Decide to design parallel data collection questions -- Decide if the data will be collected on two, independent sources or a single source -- Explanatory Design -- Decide whether to use the same or different individuals in both samples -- Decide on the sizes for the two samples -- Decide what quantitative results to follow up -- Decide how to select the best participants for the qualitative follow-up phase -- Decide how to describe the emerging follow-up phase for institutional review board approval -- Exploratory Design -- Decide who and how many individuals to include in the sample for the quantitative phase -- Decide how to describe the emerging follow-up phase for institutional review board approval -- Decide what aspects of the qualitative results to use to inform the quantitative data collection -- Decide what steps to take in developing a good quantitative instrument -- Decide how to convey the instrument development component in a procedural diagram -- Embedded Design -- Decide the reason and timing for embedding a second type of data within a larger design -- Decide whether the issue of introducing bias within an embedded experiment is a concern -- Decide what approach will provide the design or procedure for collecting quantitative and qualitative data -- Decide what data collection issues can be anticipated within the chosen design or procedure -- Transformative Design -- Decide how best to refer to and interact with participants -- Decide what sampling strategies will promote inclusiveness --

Decide how to actively involve participants in the data collection process -- Decide to use instruments that are sensitive to the cultural context of the group being studied -- Decide how the data collection process and outcomes will benefit the community being studied -- Multiphase Design -- Decide to use multiple sampling strategies -- Decide how to sample and collect data for each phase -- Decide how to handle measurement and attrition issues -- Decide on the programmatic thrust to provide the framework for the multiphase projects -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Chapter 7. Analyzing and Interpreting Data in Mixed Methods Research -- The Basics of Quantitative and Qualitative Data Analysis and Interpretation -- Preparing the Data for Analysis -- Exploring the Data -- Analyzing the Data -- Representing the Data Analysis -- Interpreting the Results -- Validating the Data and Results -- Data Analysis and Interpretation Within Mixed Methods Designs -- Steps and Key Decisions in Data Analysis for Each Mixed Methods Design -- Decisions for Merged Data Analysis in a Concurrent Approach -- Strategies for comparing results -- Strategies for interpreting merged results and reconciling differences -- Decisions for Connected Data Analysis in a Sequential Approach -- Strategies for connected data analysis -- Strategies for interpreting connected results -- Validation and Mixed Methods Designs -- Software Applications and Mixed Methods Data Analysis -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Chapter 8. Writing and Evaluating Mixed Methods Research -- General Guidelines for Writing -- Relate the Structure to the Mixed Methods Design -- Structure of a Proposal for a Mixed Methods Dissertation or Thesis -- Structure of a Mixed Methods Dissertation or Thesis -- Structure for a National Institutes of Health Proposal -- Structure of a Mixed Methods Journal Article -- Evaluating a Mixed Methods Study -- Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluation Criteria -- Mixed Methods Evaluation Criteria -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Chapter 9. Summary and Recommendations -- On Writing a Methodological Paper -- On Defining Mixed Methods -- On Using Terms -- On Using Philosophy -- On Designing Procedures -- On the Value Added by Mixed Methods -- Summary -- Activities -- Additional Resources to Examine -- Appendix A. An Example of the Convergent Parallel Design (Wittink, Barg, & Gallo, 2006) -- Appendix B. An Example of the Explanatory Sequential Design (Ivankova & Stick, 2007) -- Appendix C. An Example of the Exploratory Sequential Design (Myers & Oetzel, 2003) -- Appendix D. An Example of the Embedded Design (Brady & O'Regan, 2009) -- Appendix E. An Example of the Transformative Design (Hodgkin, 2008) -- Appendix F. An Example of the Multiphase Design (Nastasi et al., 2007).

"Combining the latest thinking about mixed methods research designs with practical, step-by-step guidance, the Second Edition of Designing and Conducting Mixed Methods Research now covers six major mixed methods designs. Authors John W. Creswell and Vicki L. Plano Clark walk readers through the entire research process, from formulating questions to designing, collecting data, and interpreting results and include updated examples from published mixed methods studies drawn from the social, behavioral, health, and education disciplines."--Pub. desc.

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