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Postcolonial developments : agriculture in the making of modern India / Akhil Gupta.

By: Gupta, Akhil, 1959-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 1998Description: xv, 409 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780822322139 (pbk.) .Subject(s): Agriculture -- India -- Alīpura | Agriculture and state -- India -- Alīpura | Rural development -- India -- Alīpura | Ethnoscience -- India -- Alīpura | Environmental policy -- India -- Alīpura | Alīpura (India) -- Rural conditionsDDC classification: 307.141209542 GUP Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
1. Agrarian Populism in the Development of a Modern Nation 2. Developmentalism, State Power, and Local Politics in Alipur 3. "Indigenous" Knowledges: Agronomy 4. "Indigenous" Knowledges: Ecology 5. Peasants and Global Environmentalism: A New Form of Governmentality?
Summary: Based on fieldwork done in the village of Alipur in rural north India from the early 1980s through the 19902, this book examines development itself as a post-World War II socio-political ideological formation, critiques related policies, and explores the various uses of the concept of 'indigenous' in several discursive contexts.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
307.141209542 GUP 007774 (Browse shelf) Available 007774

Includes bibliographical references (p. [379]-397) and index.

1. Agrarian Populism in the Development of a Modern Nation
2. Developmentalism, State Power, and Local Politics in Alipur
3. "Indigenous" Knowledges: Agronomy
4. "Indigenous" Knowledges: Ecology
5. Peasants and Global Environmentalism: A New Form of Governmentality?

Based on fieldwork done in the village of Alipur in rural north India from the early 1980s through the 19902, this book examines development itself as a post-World War II socio-political ideological formation, critiques related policies, and explores the various uses of the concept of 'indigenous' in several discursive contexts.

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