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Charter of the new urbanism : congress for the new urbanism / edited by Emily Talen.

Contributor(s): Talen, Emily, 1958- [editor. ].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : McGraw Hill Education, 2013Edition: Second edition.Description: xvii, 302 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780071806077 (pbk. : acidfree paper); 0071806075 (pbk. : acidfree paper).Subject(s): Metropolitan areas -- United States | Cities and towns -- United States | Regional planning -- United States | City planning -- United States | Neighborhoods -- United States | Architectural designDDC classification: 307.760973 CHA.R Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
Foreword / Shelley R. Poticha -- What's new about the new urbanism / Jonathan Barnett -- 20 years of new urbanism / Andrés Duany -- The metropolitan region is a fundamental economic unit of the contemporary world. Governmental cooperation, public policy, physical planning, and economic strategies must reflect this new reality. / Essay by Peter Calthorpe - Commentary by Patrick Condon -- Metropolitan regions are finite places with geographic boundaries derived from topography, watersheds, coastlines, farmlands, regional parks, and river basins. The metropolis is made of multiple centers that are cities, towns, and villages, each with its own identifiable center and edges. / Essay by Robert D. Yaro - Commentary by F. Kaid Benfield -- The metropolis has a fragile and complex relationship with its agrarian hinterland and surrounding natural landscapes, involving environmental, economic, and cultural elements. Farmland and nature are as important to the metropolis as the garden is to the house. / Essay by Randall Arendt - Commentary by Dan Slone -- Development patterns should not blur or eradicate the edges of the metropolis. Infill development within existing areas conserves environmental resources, economic investment, and social fabric, while reclaiming marginal and abandoned areas. Metropolitan regions should develop strategies to encourage such infill development over peripheral expansion. / Essay by Jacky Grimshaw - Commentary by Russell S. Preston -- Where appropriate, new development contiguous to urban boundaries should be organized as neighborhoods and districts, and be integrated with the existing urban pattern. Noncontiguous development should be organized as towns and villages with their own urban edges, and planned for a jobs/housing balance, not as bedroom suburbs. / Essay by Wendy Morris - Commentary by Paul Murrain -- The development and redevelopment of towns and cities should respect historical patterns, precedents, and boundaries. / Essay by Stephanie Bothwell - Commentary by Michael Mehaffy -- Cities and towns should bring into proximity a broad spectrum of public and private use to support a regional economy that benefits people of all incomes. Affordable housing should be distributed throughout the region to match job opportunities and to avoid concentrations of poverty. / Essay by Shelley Poticha - Commentaries by Emily Talen and Henry R. Richmond -- The physical organization of the region should be supported by a framework of transportation alternatives. Transit, pedestrian, and bicycle systems should maximize access and mobility throughout the region while reducing dependence on the automobile. / Essay by G. B. Arrington - Commentary by Richard Allen Hall -- Revenues and resources can be shared more cooperatively among the municipalities and centers within regions to avoid destructive competition for tax base and to promote rational coordination of transportation, recreation, public services, housing, and community institutions. / Essay by Myron Orfield - Commentary by Ann Daigle -- The neighborhood, the district, and the corridor are the essential elements of development and redevelopment in the metropolis. They form identifiable areas that encourage citizens to take responsibility for their maintenance and evolution. / Essay by Jonathan Barnett - Commentary by Sandy Sorlien -- Neighborhoods should be compact, pedestrian-friendly, and mixed-use. Districts generally emphasize a special single use, and should follow the principles of neighborhood design when possible. Corridors are regional connectors of neighborhoods and districts; they range from boulevards and rail lines to rivers and parkways. / Essay by Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk -- Many activities of daily living should occur within walking distance, allowing independence to those who do not drive, especially the elderly and the young. Interconnected networks of streets should be designed to encourage walking, reduce the number and length of automobile trips, and conserve energy. / Essay by Walter Kulash - Commentary by Anne Vernez Moudon -- Within neighborhoods, a broad range of housing types and price levels can bring people of diverse ages, races, and incomes into daily interaction, strengthening the personal and civic bonds essential to an authentic community. / Essay by Laurie Volk and Todd Zimmerman - Commentaries by Gianni Longo, Marc A. Weiss, and Ethan Goffman -- Transit corridors, when properly planned and coordinated, can help organize metropolitan structure and revitalize urban centers. In contrast, highway corridors should not displace investment from existing centers. / Essay by John Norquist - Commentary by Ellen Dunham-Jones and June Williamson -- Appropriate building densities and land uses should be within walking distance of transit stops, permitting public transit to become a viable alternative to the automobile. / Essay by William Liberman - Commentary by Mike Lydon -- Concentrations of civic, institutional, and commercial activity should be embedded in neighborhoods and districts, not isolated in remote, single-use complexes. Schools should be sized and located to enable children to walk or bicycle to them. / Essay by Elizabeth Moule - Commentary by Nathan R. Norris -- The economic health and harmonious evolution of neighborhoods, districts, and corridors can be improved through graphic urban design codes that serve as predictable guides for change. / Essay by Bill Lennertz and Geoffrey Ferrell - Commentaries by Hazel Borys and Jennifer Hurley -- A range of parks, from tot lots and village greens to ball fields and community gardens, should be distributed within neighborhoods. Conservation areas and open lands should be used to define and connect different neighborhoods and districts. / Essay by Thomas J. Comitta - Commentary by Thomas E. Low -- A primary task of all urban architecture and landscape design is the physical definition of streets and public spaces as places of shared use. / Essay by Daniel Solomon - Commentary by Galina Tachieva -- Individual architectural projects should be seamlessly linked to their surroundings. This issue transcends style. / Essay by Stefanos Polyzoides - Commentary by Dhiru Thadani -- The revitalization of urban places depends on safety and security. The design of streets and buildings should reinforce safe environments, but not at the expense of accessibility and openness. / Essay by Ray Gindroz - Commentary by Tony Hiss -- In the contemporary metropolis, development must adequately accommodate automobiles. It should do so in ways that respect the pedestrian and the form of public space. / Essay by Doug Farr - Commentary by Laurence Aurbach -- Streets and squares should be safe, comfortable, and interesting to the pedestrian. Properly configured, they encourage walking and enable neighbors to know each other and protect their communities. / Essay by victor Dover - Commentary by John Massengale -- Architecture and landscape design should grow from local climate, topography, history, and building practice. / Essay by Douglas Kelbaugh - Commentary by James Howard Kuntsler -- Civic buildings and public gathering places require important sites to reinforce community identity and the culture of democracy. They deserve distinctive form, because their role is different from that of other buildings and places that constitute the fabric of the city. / Essay by Andrés Duany - Commentary by Philip Bess -- All buildings should provide their inhabitants with a clear sense of location, weather, and time. Natural methods of heating and cooling can be more resource-efficient than mechanical systems. / Essay by Mark M. Schimmenti - Commentary by Steve Mouzon -- Preservation and renewal of historic buildings, districts, and landscapes affirm the continuity and evolution of urban society. / Essay by Ken Greenberg - Commentary by Howard Blackson -- Afterword: CNU expanded / By Peter Calthorpe -- Postscript: completing the CNU charter / By Léon Krier -- Epilogue: Amending the charter / Commentaries by Sandy Sorlien and John Massengale.
Summary: This new edition re-introduces the principles of New Urbanism, now updated to reflect the realities of the 21st century.
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Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
307.760973 CHA.R 007614 (Browse shelf) Available 007614

Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-283) and index.

Foreword / Shelley R. Poticha --
What's new about the new urbanism / Jonathan Barnett --
20 years of new urbanism / Andrés Duany --
The metropolitan region is a fundamental economic unit of the contemporary world. Governmental cooperation, public policy, physical planning, and economic strategies must reflect this new reality. / Essay by Peter Calthorpe - Commentary by Patrick Condon --
Metropolitan regions are finite places with geographic boundaries derived from topography, watersheds, coastlines, farmlands, regional parks, and river basins. The metropolis is made of multiple centers that are cities, towns, and villages, each with its own identifiable center and edges. / Essay by Robert D. Yaro - Commentary by F. Kaid Benfield --
The metropolis has a fragile and complex relationship with its agrarian hinterland and surrounding natural landscapes, involving environmental, economic, and cultural elements. Farmland and nature are as important to the metropolis as the garden is to the house. / Essay by Randall Arendt - Commentary by Dan Slone --
Development patterns should not blur or eradicate the edges of the metropolis. Infill development within existing areas conserves environmental resources, economic investment, and social fabric, while reclaiming marginal and abandoned areas. Metropolitan regions should develop strategies to encourage such infill development over peripheral expansion. / Essay by Jacky Grimshaw - Commentary by Russell S. Preston --
Where appropriate, new development contiguous to urban boundaries should be organized as neighborhoods and districts, and be integrated with the existing urban pattern. Noncontiguous development should be organized as towns and villages with their own urban edges, and planned for a jobs/housing balance, not as bedroom suburbs. / Essay by Wendy Morris - Commentary by Paul Murrain --
The development and redevelopment of towns and cities should respect historical patterns, precedents, and boundaries. / Essay by Stephanie Bothwell - Commentary by Michael Mehaffy --
Cities and towns should bring into proximity a broad spectrum of public and private use to support a regional economy that benefits people of all incomes. Affordable housing should be distributed throughout the region to match job opportunities and to avoid concentrations of poverty. / Essay by Shelley Poticha - Commentaries by Emily Talen and Henry R. Richmond --
The physical organization of the region should be supported by a framework of transportation alternatives. Transit, pedestrian, and bicycle systems should maximize access and mobility throughout the region while reducing dependence on the automobile. / Essay by G. B. Arrington - Commentary by Richard Allen Hall --
Revenues and resources can be shared more cooperatively among the municipalities and centers within regions to avoid destructive competition for tax base and to promote rational coordination of transportation, recreation, public services, housing, and community institutions. / Essay by Myron Orfield - Commentary by Ann Daigle --
The neighborhood, the district, and the corridor are the essential elements of development and redevelopment in the metropolis. They form identifiable areas that encourage citizens to take responsibility for their maintenance and evolution. / Essay by Jonathan Barnett - Commentary by Sandy Sorlien --
Neighborhoods should be compact, pedestrian-friendly, and mixed-use. Districts generally emphasize a special single use, and should follow the principles of neighborhood design when possible. Corridors are regional connectors of neighborhoods and districts; they range from boulevards and rail lines to rivers and parkways. / Essay by Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk --
Many activities of daily living should occur within walking distance, allowing independence to those who do not drive, especially the elderly and the young. Interconnected networks of streets should be designed to encourage walking, reduce the number and length of automobile trips, and conserve energy. / Essay by Walter Kulash - Commentary by Anne Vernez Moudon --
Within neighborhoods, a broad range of housing types and price levels can bring people of diverse ages, races, and incomes into daily interaction, strengthening the personal and civic bonds essential to an authentic community. / Essay by Laurie Volk and Todd Zimmerman - Commentaries by Gianni Longo, Marc A. Weiss, and Ethan Goffman --
Transit corridors, when properly planned and coordinated, can help organize metropolitan structure and revitalize urban centers. In contrast, highway corridors should not displace investment from existing centers. / Essay by John Norquist - Commentary by Ellen Dunham-Jones and June Williamson --
Appropriate building densities and land uses should be within walking distance of transit stops, permitting public transit to become a viable alternative to the automobile. / Essay by William Liberman - Commentary by Mike Lydon --
Concentrations of civic, institutional, and commercial activity should be embedded in neighborhoods and districts, not isolated in remote, single-use complexes. Schools should be sized and located to enable children to walk or bicycle to them. / Essay by Elizabeth Moule - Commentary by Nathan R. Norris --
The economic health and harmonious evolution of neighborhoods, districts, and corridors can be improved through graphic urban design codes that serve as predictable guides for change. / Essay by Bill Lennertz and Geoffrey Ferrell - Commentaries by Hazel Borys and Jennifer Hurley --
A range of parks, from tot lots and village greens to ball fields and community gardens, should be distributed within neighborhoods. Conservation areas and open lands should be used to define and connect different neighborhoods and districts. / Essay by Thomas J. Comitta - Commentary by Thomas E. Low --
A primary task of all urban architecture and landscape design is the physical definition of streets and public spaces as places of shared use. / Essay by Daniel Solomon - Commentary by Galina Tachieva --
Individual architectural projects should be seamlessly linked to their surroundings. This issue transcends style. / Essay by Stefanos Polyzoides - Commentary by Dhiru Thadani --
The revitalization of urban places depends on safety and security. The design of streets and buildings should reinforce safe environments, but not at the expense of accessibility and openness. / Essay by Ray Gindroz - Commentary by Tony Hiss --
In the contemporary metropolis, development must adequately accommodate automobiles. It should do so in ways that respect the pedestrian and the form of public space. / Essay by Doug Farr - Commentary by Laurence Aurbach --
Streets and squares should be safe, comfortable, and interesting to the pedestrian. Properly configured, they encourage walking and enable neighbors to know each other and protect their communities. / Essay by victor Dover - Commentary by John Massengale --
Architecture and landscape design should grow from local climate, topography, history, and building practice. / Essay by Douglas Kelbaugh - Commentary by James Howard Kuntsler --
Civic buildings and public gathering places require important sites to reinforce community identity and the culture of democracy. They deserve distinctive form, because their role is different from that of other buildings and places that constitute the fabric of the city. / Essay by Andrés Duany - Commentary by Philip Bess --
All buildings should provide their inhabitants with a clear sense of location, weather, and time. Natural methods of heating and cooling can be more resource-efficient than mechanical systems. / Essay by Mark M. Schimmenti - Commentary by Steve Mouzon --
Preservation and renewal of historic buildings, districts, and landscapes affirm the continuity and evolution of urban society. / Essay by Ken Greenberg - Commentary by Howard Blackson --
Afterword: CNU expanded / By Peter Calthorpe --
Postscript: completing the CNU charter / By Léon Krier --
Epilogue: Amending the charter / Commentaries by Sandy Sorlien and John Massengale.

This new edition re-introduces the principles of New Urbanism, now updated to reflect the realities of the 21st century.

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