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Interprofessional ethics : collaboration in the social, health and human services / Donna McAuliffe.

By: McAuliffe, Donna.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Port Melbourne : Cambridge University Press, 2014Description: xi, 203 p. ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781107650466 (pbk.); 1107650461 (pbk.).Subject(s): Human services personnel -- Professional ethics | Social service -- Australia | Professional ethics | Ethics -- Medical | Medical ethics | Ethics in public life | Sociology | Social work education -- AustraliaDDC classification: 174 MCA Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
Acknowledgements Introduction 1. Ethics in professional practice - an interprofessional perspective Negotiating working together Ethical difference - tensions between the professions What makes a profession? Professional 'sea change' Value clashes across the professions Making the case for interprofessional education Defining the interprofessional space Interprofessional ethics education - providing a clear rationale Ethical literacy - a prerequisite for professional practice Conclusion 2. Moral philosophy and ethical theory - setting the foundations Tracing the history of moral philosophy - influences on ethics education Western philosophies Eastern philosophical traditions Hindu philosophy Ethics in Buddhist philosophy Ethics in Chinese philosophy Middle Eastern philosophy Ethics in Judaism Indigenous worldviews Ethical codes within non-geographical groups Towards a global ethics Exploring ethical theories Ethical pluralism Knowing oneself ethically Why it matters 3. Ethical activism - exploring human rights and social justice in the interprofessional space Exploring the history of human rights A matter of definition Three generations of human rights Human rights contested A human rights practice approach Understanding power and the role of advocacy Connecting human rights to social justice Towards a socially just allocation of resources The complexit y of resource allocation The politics of sharing Ethical activism Micro forms of activism Activism in practice - examples from the field Interprofessional activism - strength in numbers 4. Regulation of the professions - codes of ethics and standards of practice The nature of professions - a recap Professional associations - developing professional culture and identity The development of ethical codes and practice standards Exploring and using professional codes of ethics Regulating professional practice The case of social work - a 'self-regulated' profession Responding to complaints - a framework of natural Justice 5. Ethical decision-making Exploring personal decision-making styles Structural influences on ethical decjsion-making - understanding defensive practice Ethical decision-making in the professions - a plethora of models The inclusive model of ethical decision-making - moving to the interprofessional context The process of ethical decision-making in the inclusive model - five stages Ethical decision-making - watching out for traps 6. Ethical principles in practice Understanding autonomy - maximising liberty and agency Autonomy - making our own choices Self-determination in practice - questions of capacity Paternalism - moral offensiveness or justifiable action? Informed consent - a legal obligation Informed consent in practice Privacy and confidentiality - defining 'the right to know' Privacy and confidentiality - is there a difference? Privacy in practice Confidentiality and its limits Challenges to upholding privacy and confidentiality Online platforms - the challenge to privacy and confidentiality The 'duty of care' and 'duty to warn' - how far should we go? Documentation and client records - collaborative information sharing 7. Professional integrity and e-professionalism The personal and professional - are they inseparable? Overlap between the professional and personal - caution required Managing relationships - establishing clear boundaries in practice Dual relationships - harmful or helpful? Personal self-disclosure - to tell or not to tell? What do we tell? Competence - understanding scope of practice The imposition of personal values Spiritual dimensions in practice E-professionalism - professional integrity in online communications Risks on the rise Constructing a professional online persona, or 'managing digital dirt' Engaging in online practice - further considerations 8. Ethics in the workplace Different workplaces, different experiences Interprofessional collaboration - identifying possibilities and tensions for teams Contesting territory - clarifying roles Workplace responsibilities - colleagues and managers Competing values - when organisational and professional values collide Blowing the whistle Regulating the professions Impaired practice and fitness to practice - ethical responsibilities of self-care Staying fit to practice Caring for ourselves well Ethics consultation, advice and information 9. Keeping ethics on the agenda - strategies for future practice Being ethically literate - speaking the language of ethics Being ethically congruent - knowing oneself ethically Being digitally aware Being collegial - rhetoric or reality? Being wise, brave and human References - Index.
Summary: Organisations in the social, health and human services sectors employ a range of professionals to provide dynamic and quality service and care to people across the lifespan. Interprofessional Ethics recognises that multidisciplinary teams exist in many health, government and community-based workplaces. It explores the ethical frameworks, policies and procedures of professional practice, in order to equip readers with the knowledge and skills to work within collaborative teams, and to better understand and consider the perspectives, approaches and values of others. Each chapter features reflection points, learning objectives, links to further readings and reflections from practitioners on their professional experiences. As the professional practice context becomes more complex and concerned with risk management, there is an increasing need for practitioners to be skilled in ethical decision making. Interprofessional Ethics provides a sound introduction to moral philosophy and ethical theory, professional regulation, ethical decision-making, activism, e-Professionalism, and personal and professional responsibilities.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
174 MCA 007025 (Browse shelf) Available 007025

Includes bibliographical references (pages 184-194) and index.

Acknowledgements
Introduction
1. Ethics in professional practice - an interprofessional perspective
Negotiating working together
Ethical difference - tensions between the professions
What makes a profession?
Professional 'sea change'
Value clashes across the professions
Making the case for interprofessional education
Defining the interprofessional space
Interprofessional ethics education - providing a clear rationale
Ethical literacy - a prerequisite for professional practice
Conclusion
2. Moral philosophy and ethical theory - setting the foundations
Tracing the history of moral philosophy - influences on ethics education
Western philosophies
Eastern philosophical traditions
Hindu philosophy
Ethics in Buddhist philosophy
Ethics in Chinese philosophy
Middle Eastern philosophy
Ethics in Judaism
Indigenous worldviews
Ethical codes within non-geographical groups
Towards a global ethics
Exploring ethical theories
Ethical pluralism
Knowing oneself ethically
Why it matters
3. Ethical activism - exploring human rights and social justice in the interprofessional space
Exploring the history of human rights
A matter of definition
Three generations of human rights
Human rights contested
A human rights practice approach
Understanding power and the role of advocacy
Connecting human rights to social justice
Towards a socially just allocation of resources
The complexit y of resource allocation
The politics of sharing
Ethical activism
Micro forms of activism
Activism in practice - examples from the field
Interprofessional activism - strength in numbers
4. Regulation of the professions - codes of ethics and standards of practice
The nature of professions - a recap
Professional associations - developing professional culture and identity
The development of ethical codes and practice standards
Exploring and using professional codes of ethics
Regulating professional practice
The case of social work - a 'self-regulated' profession
Responding to complaints - a framework of natural Justice
5. Ethical decision-making
Exploring personal decision-making styles
Structural influences on ethical decjsion-making - understanding defensive practice
Ethical decision-making in the professions - a plethora of models
The inclusive model of ethical decision-making - moving to the interprofessional context
The process of ethical decision-making in the inclusive model - five stages
Ethical decision-making - watching out for traps
6. Ethical principles in practice
Understanding autonomy - maximising liberty and agency
Autonomy - making our own choices
Self-determination in practice - questions of capacity
Paternalism - moral offensiveness or justifiable action?
Informed consent - a legal obligation
Informed consent in practice
Privacy and confidentiality - defining 'the right to know'
Privacy and confidentiality - is there a difference?
Privacy in practice
Confidentiality and its limits
Challenges to upholding privacy and confidentiality
Online platforms - the challenge to privacy and confidentiality
The 'duty of care' and 'duty to warn' - how far should we go?
Documentation and client records - collaborative information sharing
7. Professional integrity and e-professionalism
The personal and professional - are they inseparable?
Overlap between the professional and personal - caution required
Managing relationships - establishing clear boundaries in practice
Dual relationships - harmful or helpful?
Personal self-disclosure - to tell or not to tell?
What do we tell?
Competence - understanding scope of practice
The imposition of personal values
Spiritual dimensions in practice
E-professionalism - professional integrity in online communications
Risks on the rise
Constructing a professional online persona, or 'managing digital dirt'
Engaging in online practice - further considerations
8. Ethics in the workplace
Different workplaces, different experiences
Interprofessional collaboration - identifying possibilities and tensions for teams
Contesting territory - clarifying roles
Workplace responsibilities - colleagues and managers
Competing values - when organisational and professional values collide
Blowing the whistle
Regulating the professions
Impaired practice and fitness to practice - ethical responsibilities of self-care
Staying fit to practice
Caring for ourselves well
Ethics consultation, advice and information
9. Keeping ethics on the agenda - strategies for future practice
Being ethically literate - speaking the language of ethics
Being ethically congruent - knowing oneself ethically
Being digitally aware
Being collegial - rhetoric or reality?
Being wise, brave and human
References - Index.

Organisations in the social, health and human services sectors employ a range of professionals to provide dynamic and quality service and care to people across the lifespan. Interprofessional Ethics recognises that multidisciplinary teams exist in many health, government and community-based workplaces. It explores the ethical frameworks, policies and procedures of professional practice, in order to equip readers with the knowledge and skills to work within collaborative teams, and to better understand and consider the perspectives, approaches and values of others. Each chapter features reflection points, learning objectives, links to further readings and reflections from practitioners on their professional experiences. As the professional practice context becomes more complex and concerned with risk management, there is an increasing need for practitioners to be skilled in ethical decision making. Interprofessional Ethics provides a sound introduction to moral philosophy and ethical theory, professional regulation, ethical decision-making, activism, e-Professionalism, and personal and professional responsibilities.

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