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Determining the economic value of water : concepts and methods / Robert A. Young and John B. Loomis.

Contributor(s): Young, Robert A. (Robert Alton).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Abingdon, Oxon : RFF Press, 2014Edition: 2nd ed.Description: xix, 337 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780415838504 (pbk.); 9780415838467 (hbk.).Subject(s): Water-supply -- Economic aspects | Water resources development -- Economic aspectsDDC classification: 333.91 YOU Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: 1.Water, Economics, and the Nature of Water Policy Issues 1.1.Why is Economic Valuation Needed? 1.2.The Role of Economic Valuation in Water Management 1.3.The Nature of Economics and the Evaluation of Public Policies 2.Conceptual Framework and Special Problems in Valuing Water 2.1.Economic Value versus Other Concepts of Value 2.2.Economic Criteria for Resource Allocation and Valuation 2.3.Economic Valuation in the Absence of Market Prices 2.4.What Types of Water Values Can Be Identified? 2.5.Looking Ahead: An Overview and Taxonomy of Water Valuation Methods 3.Methods for Valuing Producers' Uses of Water 3.1.Some Preliminaries 3.2.Basic Welfare Concepts for Valuing Water in Producers' Good Uses 3.3.Applied Valuation of Producers' Water Uses with Deductive Techniques 3.4.The Basic Residual Method 1: The Product Exhaustion Theorem 3.5.The Basic Residual Method 2: The Theory of Economic Rents Contents note continued: 3.6.Basic Practical Issues in Implementing a Residual Analysis 3.7.The Special Problem of Owned Inputs in Residual Imputations 3.8.Extensions: The Change in Net Rents Method and Mathematical Programming Models 3.9.Misconceived Water Valuation Methods with Versions of the Residual Method 3.10.Concluding Evaluation of the Residual Method 3.11.The Alternative Cost Method and Other Less-Used Deductive Techniques 3.12.Valuing Producers' Water Using Inductive Techniques 3.13.Concluding Comments on Valuation in Producers' Uses 4.Applied Methods of Valuation of Water-Related Ecosystem Services 4.1.Water-Related Ecosystem Goods and Services 4.2.Revealed Preference Methods for EGS Valuation 4.3.Travel Cost Methods 4.4.The Hedonic Property Value Method (HPVM) Once Again 4.5.Defensive Behavior and Damage Cost Methods 4.6.Stated Preference Methods 4.7.The Contingent Valuation Method 4.8.Choice Modeling Contents note continued: 4.9.Concluding Comments on SP Methods 4.10.Combining SP and RP Methods 4.11.Benefit Transfer 4.12.General Conclusions Regarding Valuation of Water-Related Public Goods 5.Valuation of Water Used in Irrigated Crop Production 5.1.Background 5.2.Recapitulation of the Conceptual Framework for Valuing Irrigation Water 5.3.The Water-Crop Production Function 5.4.Inductive Techniques for Valuing Irrigation Water Including Water Markets and HPVM 5.5.Other Inductive Methods Using Primary and Secondary Data for Valuing Irrigation Water 5.6.Deductive Techniques for Valuing Irrigation Water: The Residual Method and Variations 5.7.The Alternative Cost Method Applied to Valuing Irrigation Water 5.8.Measuring Benefits of Improved Quality of Irrigation Water 5.9.Concluding Remarks on Valuation of Irrigation Water 6.Valuing Water Used by Industry 6.1.Industrial Water Use Contents note continued: 6.2.Inductive Techniques for Valuing Water in Offstream Industrial Uses 6.3.Deductive Techniques for Valuing Water in Offstream Industrial Uses 6.4.Water in Energy Production: Biofuels and Hydraulic Fracking 6.5.Valuing Water in Instream Industrial Uses: Hydropower 6.6.Valuing Water in Instream Industrial Uses: Waterborne Transportation 6.7.Concluding Remarks on Valuation of Industrial Water 7.Valuing Water in Household and Related Municipal Uses 7.1.Demand and Value of Water in Household Uses: Overview 7.2.Econometric Methods for Measuring At-Site Household Water Demand 7.3.Other Methods for Estimating Residential Water Values Including Water Markets 7.4.Finding an At-Source Value of Residential Water from an At-Site Demand Function 7.5.Measuring Benefits of Residential Water Supply Reliability 7.6.Valuing Household Water in Developing Countries 7.7.Valuing Water in Commercial Uses 7.8.Concluding Remarks Contents note continued: 8.Measuring Benefits of Flood Risk Reduction 8.1.Prefatory Remarks on Flood Risk Reduction Benefits 8.2.An Overview of the Optimal Response to Natural Hazards 8.3.Basic Steps in Measuring Flood Alleviation Benefits 8.4.Estimating Flood Alleviation Benefits in Urban Settings 8.5.Estimating Agricultural Damages Avoided 8.6.Other Research on Flood Alleviation Benefits 8.7.Concluding Remarks on Measuring Flood Risk Reduction Benefits 9.Valuation of Selected Water-Related Ecosystem Goods and Services 9.1.Valuation of Water Quality Improvements 9.2.Types of Benefits of Improving Water Quality 9.3.Valuing Instream Flows and Reservoir Levels for Outdoor Recreation 9.4.Concluding Remarks on Valuation of Water-Related Ecosystem Services 10.Conclusion.
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Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
333.91 YOU 005608 (Browse shelf) Available 005608

Includes bibliographical references (pages 301-328) and index.

Machine generated contents note: 1.Water, Economics, and the Nature of Water Policy Issues
1.1.Why is Economic Valuation Needed?
1.2.The Role of Economic Valuation in Water Management
1.3.The Nature of Economics and the Evaluation of Public Policies
2.Conceptual Framework and Special Problems in Valuing Water
2.1.Economic Value versus Other Concepts of Value
2.2.Economic Criteria for Resource Allocation and Valuation
2.3.Economic Valuation in the Absence of Market Prices
2.4.What Types of Water Values Can Be Identified?
2.5.Looking Ahead: An Overview and Taxonomy of Water Valuation Methods
3.Methods for Valuing Producers' Uses of Water
3.1.Some Preliminaries
3.2.Basic Welfare Concepts for Valuing Water in Producers' Good Uses
3.3.Applied Valuation of Producers' Water Uses with Deductive Techniques
3.4.The Basic Residual Method 1: The Product Exhaustion Theorem
3.5.The Basic Residual Method 2: The Theory of Economic Rents
Contents note continued: 3.6.Basic Practical Issues in Implementing a Residual Analysis
3.7.The Special Problem of Owned Inputs in Residual Imputations
3.8.Extensions: The Change in Net Rents Method and Mathematical Programming Models
3.9.Misconceived Water Valuation Methods with Versions of the Residual Method
3.10.Concluding Evaluation of the Residual Method
3.11.The Alternative Cost Method and Other Less-Used Deductive Techniques
3.12.Valuing Producers' Water Using Inductive Techniques
3.13.Concluding Comments on Valuation in Producers' Uses
4.Applied Methods of Valuation of Water-Related Ecosystem Services
4.1.Water-Related Ecosystem Goods and Services
4.2.Revealed Preference Methods for EGS Valuation
4.3.Travel Cost Methods
4.4.The Hedonic Property Value Method (HPVM) Once Again
4.5.Defensive Behavior and Damage Cost Methods
4.6.Stated Preference Methods
4.7.The Contingent Valuation Method
4.8.Choice Modeling
Contents note continued: 4.9.Concluding Comments on SP Methods
4.10.Combining SP and RP Methods
4.11.Benefit Transfer
4.12.General Conclusions Regarding Valuation of Water-Related Public Goods
5.Valuation of Water Used in Irrigated Crop Production
5.1.Background
5.2.Recapitulation of the Conceptual Framework for Valuing Irrigation Water
5.3.The Water-Crop Production Function
5.4.Inductive Techniques for Valuing Irrigation Water Including Water Markets and HPVM
5.5.Other Inductive Methods Using Primary and Secondary Data for Valuing Irrigation Water
5.6.Deductive Techniques for Valuing Irrigation Water: The Residual Method and Variations
5.7.The Alternative Cost Method Applied to Valuing Irrigation Water
5.8.Measuring Benefits of Improved Quality of Irrigation Water
5.9.Concluding Remarks on Valuation of Irrigation Water
6.Valuing Water Used by Industry
6.1.Industrial Water Use
Contents note continued: 6.2.Inductive Techniques for Valuing Water in Offstream Industrial Uses
6.3.Deductive Techniques for Valuing Water in Offstream Industrial Uses
6.4.Water in Energy Production: Biofuels and Hydraulic Fracking
6.5.Valuing Water in Instream Industrial Uses: Hydropower
6.6.Valuing Water in Instream Industrial Uses: Waterborne Transportation
6.7.Concluding Remarks on Valuation of Industrial Water
7.Valuing Water in Household and Related Municipal Uses
7.1.Demand and Value of Water in Household Uses: Overview
7.2.Econometric Methods for Measuring At-Site Household Water Demand
7.3.Other Methods for Estimating Residential Water Values Including Water Markets
7.4.Finding an At-Source Value of Residential Water from an At-Site Demand Function
7.5.Measuring Benefits of Residential Water Supply Reliability
7.6.Valuing Household Water in Developing Countries
7.7.Valuing Water in Commercial Uses
7.8.Concluding Remarks
Contents note continued: 8.Measuring Benefits of Flood Risk Reduction
8.1.Prefatory Remarks on Flood Risk Reduction Benefits
8.2.An Overview of the Optimal Response to Natural Hazards
8.3.Basic Steps in Measuring Flood Alleviation Benefits
8.4.Estimating Flood Alleviation Benefits in Urban Settings
8.5.Estimating Agricultural Damages Avoided
8.6.Other Research on Flood Alleviation Benefits
8.7.Concluding Remarks on Measuring Flood Risk Reduction Benefits
9.Valuation of Selected Water-Related Ecosystem Goods and Services
9.1.Valuation of Water Quality Improvements
9.2.Types of Benefits of Improving Water Quality
9.3.Valuing Instream Flows and Reservoir Levels for Outdoor Recreation
9.4.Concluding Remarks on Valuation of Water-Related Ecosystem Services
10.Conclusion.

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