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Urban outcasts : a comparative sociology of advanced marginality / Loïc Wacquant.

By: Wacquant, Loïc J. D.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Cambridge ; Malden, MA : Polity Press, 2008Description: xii, 342 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780745631240 (hbk.); 074563124X (hbk.); 0745631258 (pbk.); 9780745631257 (pbk.).Subject(s): Marginality, Social -- United States | Marginality, Social -- France | Sociology, Urban -- United States | Sociology, Urban -- FranceDDC classification: 307.76 WAC Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
Ghetto, Banlieue, Favela, et caetera: tools for rethinking urban marginality. Prologue: An old problem in a new world? -- The return of the repressed: riots, 'race' and dualization in three advanced societies. Part I. From communal ghetto to hyperghetto. The state and fate of the dark ghetto at century's close -- The cost of racial and class exclusion in 'Bronzeville' -- West side story: a high-insecurity ward in Chicago. Part II: Black belt, red belt. From conflation to comparison: how Banlieues and ghetto converge and contrast -- Stigma and division: from the core of Chicago to the margins of Paris -- Dangerous places: violence, isolation and the state. Part III. Looking ahead: urban marginality in the twenty-first century. The rise of advanced marginality: specifications and implications -- Logics of urban polarization from below. Postscript: Theory, history and politics in urban analysis.
Summary: "Breaking with the exoticizing cast of public discourse and conventional research, Urban Outcasts takes the reader inside the black ghetto of Chicago and the deindustrializing banlieue of Paris to discover that urban marginality is not everywhere the same. Drawing on a wealth of original field, survey and historical data, Loic Wacquant shows that the involution of America's urban core after the 1960s is due not to the emergence of an 'underclass', but to the joint withdrawal of market and state fostered by public policies of racial separation and urban abandonment. In European cities, by contrast, the spread of districts of 'exclusion' does not herald the formation of ghettos. It stems from the decomposition of working-class territories under the press of mass unemployment, the casualization of work and the ethnic mixing of populations hitherto segregated, spawning urban formations akin to 'anti-ghettos'."--Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
307.76 WAC 004490 (Browse shelf) Available 004490

Includes bibliographical references (p. [291]-329) and index.

Ghetto, Banlieue, Favela, et caetera: tools for rethinking urban marginality. Prologue: An old problem in a new world? --
The return of the repressed: riots, 'race' and dualization in three advanced societies. Part I. From communal ghetto to hyperghetto. The state and fate of the dark ghetto at century's close --
The cost of racial and class exclusion in 'Bronzeville' --
West side story: a high-insecurity ward in Chicago. Part II: Black belt, red belt. From conflation to comparison: how Banlieues and ghetto converge and contrast --
Stigma and division: from the core of Chicago to the margins of Paris --
Dangerous places: violence, isolation and the state. Part III. Looking ahead: urban marginality in the twenty-first century. The rise of advanced marginality: specifications and implications --
Logics of urban polarization from below. Postscript: Theory, history and politics in urban analysis.

"Breaking with the exoticizing cast of public discourse and conventional research, Urban Outcasts takes the reader inside the black ghetto of Chicago and the deindustrializing banlieue of Paris to discover that urban marginality is not everywhere the same. Drawing on a wealth of original field, survey and historical data, Loic Wacquant shows that the involution of America's urban core after the 1960s is due not to the emergence of an 'underclass', but to the joint withdrawal of market and state fostered by public policies of racial separation and urban abandonment. In European cities, by contrast, the spread of districts of 'exclusion' does not herald the formation of ghettos. It stems from the decomposition of working-class territories under the press of mass unemployment, the casualization of work and the ethnic mixing of populations hitherto segregated, spawning urban formations akin to 'anti-ghettos'."--Jacket.

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