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India, the urban transition : a case study of development urbanism / Henrik Valeur.

By: Valeur, Henrik.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Copenhagen, Denmark : The Architectural Publisher B, 2014Description: 344 p. ; ill., (some col.), maps : 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9788792700094 (pbk.).Subject(s): Urbanization -- India | City planning -- Bangalore -- Case study | City planning -- Chandigarh -- Case studyDDC classification: 307.760954 VAL Online resources: Table of contents Summary: Development urbanism is an interdisciplinary field that focuses on sustainable urban development as a means to combat poverty and protect the environment in the so-called “developing” world. Based on his experiences teaching, researching and practicing in India, the author discusses some of the problems related to the urban transition of India, including the air pollution, the contamination and depletion of fresh water resources, the precarious food situation, the lack of proper housing, and various environmental and human health problems related to motorized transportation. He also proposes a number of possible solutions, including the use of plants and natural ventilation to create clean indoor air, the revitalization of an existing system of water canals, the creation of vertical kitchen gardens in a rehabilitation colony, a strategy for making an entire neighborhood car-free and a design for self-designed, low-cost housing.--Bookcover
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Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
307.760954 VAL 004491 (Browse shelf) Available 004491

Includes bibliographical references (p. 330-332) and index.

Development urbanism is an interdisciplinary field that focuses on sustainable urban development as a means to combat poverty and protect the environment in the so-called “developing” world. Based on his experiences teaching, researching and practicing in India, the author discusses some of the problems related to the urban transition of India, including the air pollution, the contamination and depletion of fresh water resources, the precarious food situation, the lack of proper housing, and various environmental and human health problems related to motorized transportation. He also proposes a number of possible solutions, including the use of plants and natural ventilation to create clean indoor air, the revitalization of an existing system of water canals, the creation of vertical kitchen gardens in a rehabilitation colony, a strategy for making an entire neighborhood car-free and a design for self-designed, low-cost housing.--Bookcover

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