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Mathematics in nature : modeling patterns in the natural world / John A. Adam.

By: Adam, John A.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Hyderabad : Universities Press, c2003Description: xxii, 360 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9788173715082 (pbk.).Subject(s): Biological systems -- Mathematical models | Mathematics in nature | Mathematical modelsDDC classification: 511.8 ADA Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; Prologue: Why I Might Never Have Written This Book; Chapter One: The Confluence of Nature and Mathematical Modeling; Chapter Two: Estimation: The Power of Arithmetic in Solving Fermi Problems; Chapter Three: Shape, Size, and Similarity: The Problem of Scale; Chapter Four: Meteorological Optics I: Shadows, Crepuscular Rays, and Related Optical Phenomena; Chapter Five: Meteorological Optics Ii: A "Calculus I" Approach to Rainbows, Halos, and Glories; Chapter Six: Clouds, Sand Dunes, and Hurricanes; Chapter Seven: (Linear) Waves of All Kinds; Chapter Eight: Stability. Chapter Nine: Bores and Nonlinear WavesChapter Ten: The Fibonacci Sequence and the Golden Ratio (t); Chapter Eleven: Bees, Honeycombs, Bubbles, and Mud Cracks; Chapter Twelve: River Meanders, Branching Patterns, and Trees; Chapter Thirteen: Bird Flight; Chapter Fourteen: How Did the Leopard Get Its Spots?; Appendix: Fractals: An Appetite Whetter. . .; Bibliography; Index.
Summary: From rainbows, river meanders, and shadows to spider webs, honeycombs, and the markings on animal coats, the visible world is full of patterns that can be described mathematically. Examining such readily observable phenomena, this book introduces readers to the beauty of nature as revealed by mathematics and the beauty of mathematics as revealed in nature.Generously illustrated, written in an informal style, and replete with examples from everyday life, Mathematics in Nature is an excellent and undaunting introduction to the ideas and methods of mathematical modeling.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
511.8 ADA 002268 (Browse shelf) Available 002268

Includes bibliographical references (p. [341]-355) and index.

Cover; Contents; Preface; Prologue: Why I Might Never Have Written This Book; Chapter One: The Confluence of Nature and Mathematical Modeling; Chapter Two: Estimation: The Power of Arithmetic in Solving Fermi Problems; Chapter Three: Shape, Size, and Similarity: The Problem of Scale; Chapter Four: Meteorological Optics I: Shadows, Crepuscular Rays, and Related Optical Phenomena; Chapter Five: Meteorological Optics Ii: A "Calculus I" Approach to Rainbows, Halos, and Glories; Chapter Six: Clouds, Sand Dunes, and Hurricanes; Chapter Seven: (Linear) Waves of All Kinds; Chapter Eight: Stability.
Chapter Nine: Bores and Nonlinear WavesChapter Ten: The Fibonacci Sequence and the Golden Ratio (t); Chapter Eleven: Bees, Honeycombs, Bubbles, and Mud Cracks; Chapter Twelve: River Meanders, Branching Patterns, and Trees; Chapter Thirteen: Bird Flight; Chapter Fourteen: How Did the Leopard Get Its Spots?; Appendix: Fractals: An Appetite Whetter. . .; Bibliography; Index.

From rainbows, river meanders, and shadows to spider webs, honeycombs, and the markings on animal coats, the visible world is full of patterns that can be described mathematically. Examining such readily observable phenomena, this book introduces readers to the beauty of nature as revealed by mathematics and the beauty of mathematics as revealed in nature.Generously illustrated, written in an informal style, and replete with examples from everyday life, Mathematics in Nature is an excellent and undaunting introduction to the ideas and methods of mathematical modeling.

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