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A stream of windows : unsettling reflections on trade, immigration, and democracy / Jagdish Bhagwati.

By: Bhagwati, Jagdish N, 1934-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Delhi : Oxford University Press, 1998Description: liii, 531 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0195650484 (hbk.); 9780195650488 (pbk.).Other title: Unsettling reflections on trade, immigration, and democracy.Subject(s): Free trade | Protectionism | Democracy | United States -- Emigration and immigration | United States -- Foreign economic relations -- Japan | Japan -- Foreign economic relations -- United StatesDDC classification: 337.73 BHA Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
I. Trade in the Global Age. 1. A New Epoch? 2. The Global Age: From a Skeptical South to a Fearful North II. On the Mat: The Poverty of Protectionism. 3. The Poverty of Protectionism III. The Diminished Giant Syndrome: The Obsessive Search for "Fair Trade" and Reciprocity. 4. The Diminished Giant Syndrome: How Declinism Drives Trade Policy. 5. Hormones and Trade Wars. 6. The Dangers of Selective Safeguards. 7. Brie for Breakfast. 8. Rough Trade. 9. An Unhealthy Obsession with Reciprocity IV. Aggressive Unilateralism: Playing at High Noon. 10. Super 301's Big Bite Flouts the Rules. 11. It's the Process, Stupid! V. Japan on One's Mind: The Clintonites down the Precipice. 12. What Buchanan Owes Clinton. 13. Trade Wars. 14. Facing the Japanese Challenge. 15. The Japanese - Not So Inscrutable to Adam Smith. 16. The Fraudulent Case against Japan. 17. On Boiling Frogs. 18. Samurais No More. 19. Japan Must Now Say No. 20. Is This Showdown Necessary? 21. The U.S.-Japan Car Dispute: A Monumental Mistake VI. The Folly of "Fair Trade before Free Trade": Environment and Labor Standards. 22. The Case for Free Trade. 23. American Rules, Mexican Jobs. 24. Trade Liberalisation and "Fair Trade" Demands: Addressing the Environmental and Labour Standards Issues VII. Free Trade Areas Are Not Free Trade! 25. Let GATT Live. 26. Why Ross Is Wrong. 27. Beyond NAFTA: Clinton's Trading Choices. 28. Preferential Trade Agreements: The Wrong Road. 29. The Watering of Trade. 30. Threats to the World Trading System: Income Distribution and the Selfish Hegemon VIII. Coping with Immigration. 31. A Champion for Migrating Peoples. 32. Behind the Green Card. 33. Control Immigration at the Border. 34. Sanctuary. 35. Student Visas Drop Anchor. 36. The U.S. Brain Gain - At the Expense of Blacks? 37. The False Alarm of "Too Many Scientists" 38. Free Trade Can Cut Health Costs. 39. Bashing the Illegals IX. Democracy and Its Contents. 40. Democracy and Development: New Thinking on an Old Question. 41. Better than Bloomsbury? 42. America Grows Roots Outside the Old Testament. 43. Learning from the Religions of Others. 44. Crisis Helps Advance Ideological Positions on Population Growth. 45. Panic, Petulance, and Paranoia about Japan. 46. "Agents of Influence": An Exchange. 47. Exclude the Exclusionary Rule. 48. Recalling Orwell X. In the Ring: With Soros, Wriston, Sachs, and Valenti. 49. Wheel of Fortune. 50. In the Market We Trust. 51. Shock Treatments. 52. Free Trade at the Movies Puts U.S. in New Role XI. Economists and Economics. 53. Remembering Harry G. Johnson. 54. On Learned Journals in Economics. 55. The End of All Our Exploring. 56. A Machine for Going Backwards.
Summary: Jagdish Bhagwati firmly believes that those who work at the frontiers of economics should also get down into the trenches of public policy in the only way they can: through advocacy. His frequent writings in leading newspapers and magazines are further testimony to his conviction that academics can best do public good by becoming a public nuisance. Running through his writings is the contrary voice, questioning popular positions, challenging the consensus. A Stream of Windows offers a selection of the author's policy writings from the past ten years. The title, from a James Schuyler poem, suggests the fluidity of a stream, contrasted with a stagnant pool, as well as the windows the author seeks to open to bring in fresh air. The image captures the essence of the author's writings, which forcefully opposed the demonization of Japan in the 1980s and early 1990s, and which expose the folly of current U.S. policy equating free trade with free trade areas, challenge the bipartisan bashing of illegal immigrants, refute the conventional view that democracy hinders development, and much more.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
337.73 BHA 000189 (Browse shelf) Available 000189

Includes bibliographical references and index.

I. Trade in the Global Age. 1. A New Epoch? 2. The Global Age: From a Skeptical South to a Fearful North
II. On the Mat: The Poverty of Protectionism. 3. The Poverty of Protectionism
III. The Diminished Giant Syndrome: The Obsessive Search for "Fair Trade" and Reciprocity. 4. The Diminished Giant Syndrome: How Declinism Drives Trade Policy. 5. Hormones and Trade Wars. 6. The Dangers of Selective Safeguards. 7. Brie for Breakfast. 8. Rough Trade. 9. An Unhealthy Obsession with Reciprocity
IV. Aggressive Unilateralism: Playing at High Noon. 10. Super 301's Big Bite Flouts the Rules. 11. It's the Process, Stupid!
V. Japan on One's Mind: The Clintonites down the Precipice. 12. What Buchanan Owes Clinton. 13. Trade Wars. 14. Facing the Japanese Challenge. 15. The Japanese - Not So Inscrutable to Adam Smith. 16. The Fraudulent Case against Japan. 17. On Boiling Frogs. 18. Samurais No More. 19. Japan Must Now Say No. 20. Is This Showdown Necessary? 21. The U.S.-Japan Car Dispute: A Monumental Mistake
VI. The Folly of "Fair Trade before Free Trade": Environment and Labor Standards. 22. The Case for Free Trade. 23. American Rules, Mexican Jobs. 24. Trade Liberalisation and "Fair Trade" Demands: Addressing the Environmental and Labour Standards Issues
VII. Free Trade Areas Are Not Free Trade! 25. Let GATT Live. 26. Why Ross Is Wrong. 27. Beyond NAFTA: Clinton's Trading Choices. 28. Preferential Trade Agreements: The Wrong Road. 29. The Watering of Trade. 30. Threats to the World Trading System: Income Distribution and the Selfish Hegemon
VIII. Coping with Immigration. 31. A Champion for Migrating Peoples. 32. Behind the Green Card. 33. Control Immigration at the Border. 34. Sanctuary. 35. Student Visas Drop Anchor. 36. The U.S. Brain Gain - At the Expense of Blacks? 37. The False Alarm of "Too Many Scientists" 38. Free Trade Can Cut Health Costs. 39. Bashing the Illegals
IX. Democracy and Its Contents. 40. Democracy and Development: New Thinking on an Old Question. 41. Better than Bloomsbury? 42. America Grows Roots Outside the Old Testament. 43. Learning from the Religions of Others. 44. Crisis Helps Advance Ideological Positions on Population Growth. 45. Panic, Petulance, and Paranoia about Japan. 46. "Agents of Influence": An Exchange. 47. Exclude the Exclusionary Rule. 48. Recalling Orwell
X. In the Ring: With Soros, Wriston, Sachs, and Valenti. 49. Wheel of Fortune. 50. In the Market We Trust. 51. Shock Treatments. 52. Free Trade at the Movies Puts U.S. in New Role
XI. Economists and Economics. 53. Remembering Harry G. Johnson. 54. On Learned Journals in Economics. 55. The End of All Our Exploring. 56. A Machine for Going Backwards.

Jagdish Bhagwati firmly believes that those who work at the frontiers of economics should also get down into the trenches of public policy in the only way they can: through advocacy. His frequent writings in leading newspapers and magazines are further testimony to his conviction that academics can best do public good by becoming a public nuisance. Running through his writings is the contrary voice, questioning popular positions, challenging the consensus. A Stream of Windows offers a selection of the author's policy writings from the past ten years. The title, from a James Schuyler poem, suggests the fluidity of a stream, contrasted with a stagnant pool, as well as the windows the author seeks to open to bring in fresh air. The image captures the essence of the author's writings, which forcefully opposed the demonization of Japan in the 1980s and early 1990s, and which expose the folly of current U.S. policy equating free trade with free trade areas, challenge the bipartisan bashing of illegal immigrants, refute the conventional view that democracy hinders development, and much more.

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