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Headspace : The psychology of city living / Paul Keedwell.

By: Keedwell, Paul [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Aurum, an imprint of The Quarto Group, 2017Description: 301 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781781316115 (hbk.).Subject(s): City and town life -- Psychological aspects | Urban ecology (Sociology) | Urban population | City dwellers | Urban healthDDC classification: 155.942 KEE
Contents:
pt. One The Home, From Inside Out ch. 1 Refuge versus prospect ch. 2 Mystery and complexity ch. 3 Closure ch. 4 Nature in the home pt. Two Home and Identity ch. 5 Status objects versus personal objects ch. 6 Space sharing ch. 7 The stamp of personality ch. 8 Tailor-made homes pt. Three Neighbourhood ch. 9 Street life ch. 10 Protecting the territory ch. 11 The spirit of place pt. Four High-rise Living ch. 12 Vertigo and other fears ch. 13 Making better high-rises pt. Five Public Places: Places for Play ch. 14 Child's play ch. 15 Adults are kids, too: green spaces ch. 16 Recreational buildings pt. Six The Workplace ch. 17 Open-plan? ch. 18 Self-expression pt. Seven Healing Spaces ch. 19 A healthy atmosphere ch. 20 End of life.
Summary: In this book the author uncovers the secret psychology of the city and how it affects our daily happiness. More and more of us are choosing to live in the man-made environment of the city. The mismatch between this artificial world and our nature-starved souls can contribute to the stresses of city living in a way that is barely noticed - but is crucially important. What does the science of architectural psychology tell us about how the world of brick and concrete affects how we think, feel and behave? In an increasingly crowded urban world, how does good urban design inspire, restore and bring us together? Conversely, how does bad architecture cause anxiety, alienation and depression? Starting with the home and reaching out to the street, neighbourhood and wider city landscape, Headspace teaches us how to see our cities differently, and how we can best adapt to our rapidly changing urban world.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
155.942 KEE 014589 (Browse shelf) Available 014589

Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-294) and index.

pt. One The Home, From Inside Out
ch. 1 Refuge versus prospect
ch. 2 Mystery and complexity
ch. 3 Closure
ch. 4 Nature in the home
pt. Two Home and Identity
ch. 5 Status objects versus personal objects
ch. 6 Space sharing
ch. 7 The stamp of personality
ch. 8 Tailor-made homes
pt. Three Neighbourhood
ch. 9 Street life
ch. 10 Protecting the territory
ch. 11 The spirit of place
pt. Four High-rise Living
ch. 12 Vertigo and other fears
ch. 13 Making better high-rises
pt. Five Public Places: Places for Play
ch. 14 Child's play
ch. 15 Adults are kids, too: green spaces
ch. 16 Recreational buildings
pt. Six The Workplace
ch. 17 Open-plan?
ch. 18 Self-expression
pt. Seven Healing Spaces
ch. 19 A healthy atmosphere
ch. 20 End of life.

In this book the author uncovers the secret psychology of the city and how it affects our daily happiness. More and more of us are choosing to live in the man-made environment of the city. The mismatch between this artificial world and our nature-starved souls can contribute to the stresses of city living in a way that is barely noticed - but is crucially important. What does the science of architectural psychology tell us about how the world of brick and concrete affects how we think, feel and behave? In an increasingly crowded urban world, how does good urban design inspire, restore and bring us together? Conversely, how does bad architecture cause anxiety, alienation and depression? Starting with the home and reaching out to the street, neighbourhood and wider city landscape, Headspace teaches us how to see our cities differently, and how we can best adapt to our rapidly changing urban world.

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