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Creating cities/​building cities : architecture and urban competitiveness /​ Peter Karl Kresl with Daniele Ietri.

By: Kresl, Peter K [author.].
Contributor(s): Daniele, Ietri [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Cheltenham, UK : Edward Elgar, 2017Description: v, 209 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781786431608 (hbk.).Subject(s): City planning | Urban renewal | Urban beautification | City &​ town planning -- architectural aspectsDDC classification: 307.1​216 KRE
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: architecture and modern cities -- pt. I THE HARD SIDE -- 2. Stimulating the revival of the city -- 3. Establishing business center status -- 4. Establishing global city status -- the world's tallest building -- 5. Creating transformative parks -- pt. II THE SOFT SIDE -- 6. Establishing a "brand" or "identity" -- 7. Relating the city to the nation -- 8. Attracting a specific social cohort -- 9. Creating community -- pt. III FINAL THOUGHTS -- 10. What happens when a city fails to use architecture creatively? -- 11. Some observations and conclusions.
Summary: For the past 150 years, architecture has been a significant tool in the hands of city planners and leaders. In Creating Cities/Building Cities, Peter Karl Kresl and Daniele Ietri illustrate how these planners and leaders have utilized architecture to achieve a variety of aims, influencing the situation, perception and competitiveness of their cities. Whether the objective is branding, re-vitalization of the economy, beautification, development of an economic and business center, status development, or seeking distinction with the tallest building, distinctive architecture has been an essential instrument for those who manage the course of a city's development. Since the 1870s, and the reconstruction of Chicago following the Great Fire, architecture has been affected powerfully by advances in design, technology and materials used in construction. The authors identify several key elements in such a strategic initiative and in the penultimate chapter examine several cases of cities that have ignored one or more of these elements and have failed in their attempt. A unique set of insights into this fascinating topic, this study will appeal to specialists in urban planning, economic geography and architecture. Readers interested in urban development will also find its coverage accessible and enlightening.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
On Display
307.1216 KRE 014392 (Browse shelf) Available 014392

Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: architecture and modern cities --
pt. I THE HARD SIDE --
2. Stimulating the revival of the city --
3. Establishing business center status --
4. Establishing global city status --
the world's tallest building --
5. Creating transformative parks --
pt. II THE SOFT SIDE --
6. Establishing a "brand" or "identity" --
7. Relating the city to the nation --
8. Attracting a specific social cohort --
9. Creating community --
pt. III FINAL THOUGHTS --
10. What happens when a city fails to use architecture creatively? --
11. Some observations and conclusions.

For the past 150 years, architecture has been a significant tool in the hands of city planners and leaders. In Creating Cities/Building Cities, Peter Karl Kresl and Daniele Ietri illustrate how these planners and leaders have utilized architecture to achieve a variety of aims, influencing the situation, perception and competitiveness of their cities. Whether the objective is branding, re-vitalization of the economy, beautification, development of an economic and business center, status development, or seeking distinction with the tallest building, distinctive architecture has been an essential instrument for those who manage the course of a city's development. Since the 1870s, and the reconstruction of Chicago following the Great Fire, architecture has been affected powerfully by advances in design, technology and materials used in construction. The authors identify several key elements in such a strategic initiative and in the penultimate chapter examine several cases of cities that have ignored one or more of these elements and have failed in their attempt. A unique set of insights into this fascinating topic, this study will appeal to specialists in urban planning, economic geography and architecture. Readers interested in urban development will also find its coverage accessible and enlightening.

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