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Building smart cities : Analytics, ICT, and design thinking / Carol L. Stimmel.

By: Stimmel, Carol L [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Boca Raton : CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, c2016Description: xxiv, 266 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781498702768 (hardcover).Subject(s): City planning | City planning -- Technological innovations | Sustainable urban developmentDDC classification: 711.4 STI
Contents:
ch. One The Imperative for Smart Cities 1.1.A New Vision 1.2.What Is Smart? 1.3.A Sensitive Relationship 1.3.1.We Can't Turn Back Now 1.4.What Do We Really Want from the Smart City? 1.5.Managing the Shift 1.6.Designing for People ch. Two Technology, Innovation, and the Problem with People 2.1.Chapter Goal 2.2.Are We Really Ready for Technology Advancement? 2.2.1.A Better Vision 2.2.2.The Era of the Posthuman? 2.3.People and Technology: Collision or Cooperation? 2.4.Sensors to Services 2.4.1.What If My World Goes Down? 2.5.The Surprisingly Familiar Sensor 2.6.The Internet of Things 2.6.1.The Smart City as Mediator ch. Three A New Perspective on Smart Cities 3.1.Chapter Goal 3.2.The Position for Moving Forward 3.3.What's the Holdup? 3.3.1.The Efficient, Effective, and Optimal City? 3.4.Smart City Design Goals 3.4.1.Engineering New Models for Investing in the Smart City Contents note continued: 3.4.2.Context-Sensitive Technology Services 3.4.3.What About the Start-Up? 3.5.A Usable World 3.5.1.Livability ch. Four Why Design Thinking? 4.1.Chapter Goal 4.2.Thinking About Thinking 4.2.1.How Does This Working Definition Work? 4.2.2.How the Best Technology Fails and Where the Better Solution Wins 4.2.3.Briefly on the Brief 4.2.4.Developing Empathy 4.2.5.Ideation 4.2.6.Rational Implementation 4.3.So, What About Merging? ch. Five Design Thinking Applied 5.1.Chapter Goal 5.2.A Method, Not Magic 5.3.Ways That Design Thinking Has Been Used in Cities 5.3.1.Designing Out Crime 5.3.2.Collaborative Consumption 5.4.When Urban Design Rises Above Imposition 5.4.1.Creative Capetonians 5.5.Assessing the Usefulness of Design Thinking 5.5.1.Measuring Success Section One: Key Points Chapter One Growing Urbanization Concentrates Sustainability Challenges in Cities Contents note continued: Smart Cities Tend to Be Technology-Centric and Early Efforts Are Falling Short The Vision for Smart Cities Must Include Its People Chapter Two Technology Advancement Encompasses Both Form and Function Smart City as Mediator: Moving from Sensors to Services The Smart City Stack Chapter Three Smart City Technologies Should Focus on Improving Human Society The Approach to Bringing New Technologies to the Smart City Is Time-Tested Smart Cities Are Really About Smart Management Chapter Four Design Thinking Is a Repeatable Method for Creating New Designs Design Thinking Is Different Than the Scientific Method The Best Technology Fails When It Solves the Wrong Problem Chapter Five Smart City Design Tells a Story About the People Who Live and Work Within the Environment Design Thinking Techniques Have Already Brought Measurable Impact Design Thinking Isn't About Being Slick; It's About Creating Value Contents note continued: ch. Six Smart City Planning and Management 6.1.Chapter Goal 6.2.Smart Cities and Their Role in the Creation of a National Identity 6.2.1.World Cities 6.3.A New Role for City Government 6.4.Balancing the Forces 6.4.1.The Temptations of Reductionism 6.5.The Politics of Artifacts 6.5.1.The Politics of Safety ch. Seven The Fundamentals of Smart Infrastructure 7.1.Chapter Goal 7.2.The Energy Opportunity 7.2.1.Why So Intense? 7.3.The Building Opportunity 7.3.1.New Models, New Ways Forward 7.4.Orchestrating Our Lives, Not Just Our Buildings 7.4.1.Resource Infrastructure 7.5.The Bonds of Energy and Water 7.6.Full Convergence ch. Eight The Urban Life Force 8.1.Chapter Goal 8.2.Transportation as Animating Principle 8.3.Innovative Transportation Services 8.3.1.Transportation Analytics 8.3.2.The Most Powerful Sensor in the City Is in Your Pocket 8.3.3.Serious Planning with Our Playthings Contents note continued: 8.4.Transportation Connects 8.4.1.Getting to Well-Being 8.5.Where Do We Go Now? Section Two: Key Points Chapter Six Technology-Centric Planning Is Not a Neutral Exercise Thinking Glocal Increases Our Sense of Responsibility Safety, Social Factors, and Regulation All Influence Technology Planning Chapter Seven Resource Issues Can Best Be Treated with Integrated Solutions Increased Energy Efficiency and Decreased Intensity Are Both Key Levers The Building Sector Provides Significant Opportunity Chapter Eight Smart Transportation Solves High-Impact Human Problems ICT Brings Transportation Technologies to the Masses Transportation Analytics Can Benefit from Wide Sources of Data ch. Nine Smart City Analytics 9.1.Chapter Goal 9.2.The Vocabulary of Analytics 9.3.Analytical Models 9.3.1.When Cancer Causes Smoking 9.4.The Analytics of Things 9.4.1.It's Not Just Your Things Contents note continued: 9.5.The Analytical Intersection of Human and Machine 9.5.1.Organizing by Scale 9.6.Analytics as a Service 9.6.1.Platforms Are Cost-Effective 9.6.2.Services Require a Platform 9.6.3.The Foundations for Scale ch. Ten Technology, Social Inclusion, and the Wisdom of the Urban Community 10.1.Chapter Goal 10.2.Technology in Social Inclusion 10.3.People as Sensors 10.3.1.Convergence 10.3.2.From Access to Coordination 10.4.From Social Inclusion to Social Influence 10.5.Crowdsourcing for a Smarter City 10.5.1.Hacking the City 10.5.2.How the Crowd Revitalized an Urban Neighborhood ch. Eleven Information Security and Privacy 11.1.Chapter Goal 11.2.Drawing the Lines 11.3.Security Deserves an Important Place in Design 11.3.1.Evaluating Requirements 11.3.2.Even Security Techniques Must Be Smart 11.4.Privacy Begins in the Home 11.4.1.We Can, but Will We? Contents note continued: 11.5.The Role of Open Data in the Privacy Discussion 11.6.Putting This into Practice Section Three: Key Points Chapter Nine The Vocabulary of Analytics Various Analytics Models Can Be Applied Together to Create Value The Analytics of Things Chapter Ten The Role of Technology in the Urban Community The Nature of Convergence Is Changing in Our Cities From Social Inclusion to Social Influence Chapter Eleven The Lines of Data Privacy and Security Are Blurry The Smart City Creates Layers of Confusion Both Security and Privacy Must Be Designed in from the Beginning ch. Twelve Hacking the City 12.1.Chapter Goal 12.2.Designing Inspiration 12.2.1.Civic Hacking 12.2.2.Hacking Konigsberg 12.2.3.We're Still Walking the Edges 12.2.4.The Laws 12.3.Sociospatial Perspectives 12.3.1.People in Space, Before Place 12.3.2.Patient Zero ch. Thirteen Smart Cities: Problem or Promise? Contents note continued: 13.1.Chapter Goal 13.2.Forging a Partnership 13.2.1.Human-Centered Design Is More Than Post-It Notes 13.3.Create an Ecosystem 13.3.1.Thirty-Four Thousand Apples an Hour Keeps the Doctor Away 13.3.2.Putting a Philosophy to Work 13.4.Crossing the Chasm of Fear 13.5.How Design Thinking Can Work for the Smart City 13.6.So, You Want to Design a Smarter City? Section Four: Key Points Chapter Twelve Designing for Inspiration Understanding Networks We Are People in Space and Place Chapter Thirteen Forging a Partnership Human-Centered Design Is a Little Messy Rising Above Fear for the Benefit of the People. Section 1. Designing smart cities for human needs section 2. A review of smart city technologies section 3. Data analytics and the smart urban dweller section 4. Designing innovation.
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Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
711.4 STI 013530 (Browse shelf) Available 013530

"An Auerbach Book."

Versions from some providers lack index.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

ch. One The Imperative for Smart Cities
1.1.A New Vision
1.2.What Is Smart?
1.3.A Sensitive Relationship
1.3.1.We Can't Turn Back Now
1.4.What Do We Really Want from the Smart City?
1.5.Managing the Shift
1.6.Designing for People
ch. Two Technology, Innovation, and the Problem with People
2.1.Chapter Goal
2.2.Are We Really Ready for Technology Advancement?
2.2.1.A Better Vision
2.2.2.The Era of the Posthuman?
2.3.People and Technology: Collision or Cooperation?
2.4.Sensors to Services
2.4.1.What If My World Goes Down?
2.5.The Surprisingly Familiar Sensor
2.6.The Internet of Things
2.6.1.The Smart City as Mediator
ch. Three A New Perspective on Smart Cities
3.1.Chapter Goal
3.2.The Position for Moving Forward
3.3.What's the Holdup?
3.3.1.The Efficient, Effective, and Optimal City?
3.4.Smart City Design Goals
3.4.1.Engineering New Models for Investing in the Smart City
Contents note continued: 3.4.2.Context-Sensitive Technology Services
3.4.3.What About the Start-Up?
3.5.A Usable World
3.5.1.Livability
ch. Four Why Design Thinking?
4.1.Chapter Goal
4.2.Thinking About Thinking
4.2.1.How Does This Working Definition Work?
4.2.2.How the Best Technology Fails and Where the Better Solution Wins
4.2.3.Briefly on the Brief
4.2.4.Developing Empathy
4.2.5.Ideation
4.2.6.Rational Implementation
4.3.So, What About Merging?
ch. Five Design Thinking Applied
5.1.Chapter Goal
5.2.A Method, Not Magic
5.3.Ways That Design Thinking Has Been Used in Cities
5.3.1.Designing Out Crime
5.3.2.Collaborative Consumption
5.4.When Urban Design Rises Above Imposition
5.4.1.Creative Capetonians
5.5.Assessing the Usefulness of Design Thinking
5.5.1.Measuring Success
Section One: Key Points
Chapter One
Growing Urbanization Concentrates Sustainability Challenges in Cities
Contents note continued: Smart Cities Tend to Be Technology-Centric and Early Efforts Are Falling Short
The Vision for Smart Cities Must Include Its People
Chapter Two
Technology Advancement Encompasses Both Form and Function
Smart City as Mediator: Moving from Sensors to Services
The Smart City Stack
Chapter Three
Smart City Technologies Should Focus on Improving Human Society
The Approach to Bringing New Technologies to the Smart City Is Time-Tested
Smart Cities Are Really About Smart Management
Chapter Four
Design Thinking Is a Repeatable Method for Creating New Designs
Design Thinking Is Different Than the Scientific Method
The Best Technology Fails When It Solves the Wrong Problem
Chapter Five
Smart City Design Tells a Story About the People Who Live and Work Within the Environment
Design Thinking Techniques Have Already Brought Measurable Impact
Design Thinking Isn't About Being Slick; It's About Creating Value
Contents note continued: ch. Six Smart City Planning and Management
6.1.Chapter Goal
6.2.Smart Cities and Their Role in the Creation of a National Identity
6.2.1.World Cities
6.3.A New Role for City Government
6.4.Balancing the Forces
6.4.1.The Temptations of Reductionism
6.5.The Politics of Artifacts
6.5.1.The Politics of Safety
ch. Seven The Fundamentals of Smart Infrastructure
7.1.Chapter Goal
7.2.The Energy Opportunity
7.2.1.Why So Intense?
7.3.The Building Opportunity
7.3.1.New Models, New Ways Forward
7.4.Orchestrating Our Lives, Not Just Our Buildings
7.4.1.Resource Infrastructure
7.5.The Bonds of Energy and Water
7.6.Full Convergence
ch. Eight The Urban Life Force
8.1.Chapter Goal
8.2.Transportation as Animating Principle
8.3.Innovative Transportation Services
8.3.1.Transportation Analytics
8.3.2.The Most Powerful Sensor in the City Is in Your Pocket
8.3.3.Serious Planning with Our Playthings
Contents note continued: 8.4.Transportation Connects
8.4.1.Getting to Well-Being
8.5.Where Do We Go Now?
Section Two: Key Points
Chapter Six
Technology-Centric Planning Is Not a Neutral Exercise
Thinking Glocal Increases Our Sense of Responsibility
Safety, Social Factors, and Regulation All Influence Technology Planning
Chapter Seven
Resource Issues Can Best Be Treated with Integrated Solutions
Increased Energy Efficiency and Decreased Intensity Are Both Key Levers
The Building Sector Provides Significant Opportunity
Chapter Eight
Smart Transportation Solves High-Impact Human Problems
ICT Brings Transportation Technologies to the Masses
Transportation Analytics Can Benefit from Wide Sources of Data
ch. Nine Smart City Analytics
9.1.Chapter Goal
9.2.The Vocabulary of Analytics
9.3.Analytical Models
9.3.1.When Cancer Causes Smoking
9.4.The Analytics of Things
9.4.1.It's Not Just Your Things
Contents note continued: 9.5.The Analytical Intersection of Human and Machine
9.5.1.Organizing by Scale
9.6.Analytics as a Service
9.6.1.Platforms Are Cost-Effective
9.6.2.Services Require a Platform
9.6.3.The Foundations for Scale
ch. Ten Technology, Social Inclusion, and the Wisdom of the Urban Community
10.1.Chapter Goal
10.2.Technology in Social Inclusion
10.3.People as Sensors
10.3.1.Convergence
10.3.2.From Access to Coordination
10.4.From Social Inclusion to Social Influence
10.5.Crowdsourcing for a Smarter City
10.5.1.Hacking the City
10.5.2.How the Crowd Revitalized an Urban Neighborhood
ch. Eleven Information Security and Privacy
11.1.Chapter Goal
11.2.Drawing the Lines
11.3.Security Deserves an Important Place in Design
11.3.1.Evaluating Requirements
11.3.2.Even Security Techniques Must Be Smart
11.4.Privacy Begins in the Home
11.4.1.We Can, but Will We?
Contents note continued: 11.5.The Role of Open Data in the Privacy Discussion
11.6.Putting This into Practice
Section Three: Key Points
Chapter Nine
The Vocabulary of Analytics
Various Analytics Models Can Be Applied Together to Create Value
The Analytics of Things
Chapter Ten
The Role of Technology in the Urban Community
The Nature of Convergence Is Changing in Our Cities
From Social Inclusion to Social Influence
Chapter Eleven
The Lines of Data Privacy and Security Are Blurry
The Smart City Creates Layers of Confusion
Both Security and Privacy Must Be Designed in from the Beginning
ch. Twelve Hacking the City
12.1.Chapter Goal
12.2.Designing Inspiration
12.2.1.Civic Hacking
12.2.2.Hacking Konigsberg
12.2.3.We're Still Walking the Edges
12.2.4.The Laws
12.3.Sociospatial Perspectives
12.3.1.People in Space, Before Place
12.3.2.Patient Zero
ch. Thirteen Smart Cities: Problem or Promise?
Contents note continued: 13.1.Chapter Goal
13.2.Forging a Partnership
13.2.1.Human-Centered Design Is More Than Post-It Notes
13.3.Create an Ecosystem
13.3.1.Thirty-Four Thousand Apples an Hour Keeps the Doctor Away
13.3.2.Putting a Philosophy to Work
13.4.Crossing the Chasm of Fear
13.5.How Design Thinking Can Work for the Smart City
13.6.So, You Want to Design a Smarter City?
Section Four: Key Points
Chapter Twelve
Designing for Inspiration
Understanding Networks
We Are People in Space and Place
Chapter Thirteen
Forging a Partnership
Human-Centered Design Is a Little Messy
Rising Above Fear for the Benefit of the People.
Section 1. Designing smart cities for human needs
section 2. A review of smart city technologies
section 3. Data analytics and the smart urban dweller
section 4. Designing innovation.

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