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The world in Guangzhou : Africans and other foreigners in South China's global marketplace / Gordon Mathews with Linessa Dan Lin and Yang Yang.

By: Mathews, Gordon [author.].
Contributor(s): Lin, Linessa Dan [author.] | Yang, Yang, 1987 March 17- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Chicago : The University of Chicago Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: viii, 252 pages ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9789888455881 (paperback)..Subject(s): Africans -- China -- Guangzhou | Business enterprises -- China -- Guangzhou | Guangzhou (China) -- Ethnic relations | China -- GuangzhouDDC classification: 305.800951275 MAT
Contents:
Introduction -- What this book is about -- Impressions of Guangzhou -- A brief history of foreigners in Guangzhou -- Foreign places in Guangzhou -- How this book's research was done -- Foreigners in Guangzhou -- "The Chinese dream": stories of eight foreigners -- Rich foreigner, poor foreigner -- Race and money -- Foreign communities: Japanese and Nigerians -- The power of rumor -- Foreigners' attitudes toward China and Chinese -- African-Chinese relations -- African traders in Guangzhou: an overview -- Business deception and cheating -- Quarrels between Africans and Chinese -- Chinese views of Africans -- African views of Chinese -- Low-end globalization -- Low-end globalization/high-end globalization -- How low-end globalization works: sourcing, money, copies, and customs -- Accounts of low-end globalization -- Low-end globalization's circuits -- Legal-illegal in Guangzhou -- Paths, legal and illegal -- Visa and passport worries, jail and deportation -- Police -- Accounts of overstayers and friends -- Logistics agents, middlemen, and cultural brokers -- Logistics agents -- Middleman -- Cultural brokers -- Accounts of logistics agents, middlemen, and cultural brokers -- Religion in a foreign world -- "I believe in god but Chinese believe in gold" -- Islam in comparison to Christianity -- Christian churches -- Accounts of religious seekers -- Religion: implications -- Romance, love, marriage, and families: a Chinese Barack Obama? -- "African Chinese" -- The travails of Chinese-African romantic relationships -- Children -- Accounts of marriages -- Conclusion: the larger significance of Africans in China.
Subject: "Only decades ago, the population of Guangzhou was almost wholly Chinese. Today, it is a truly global city, a place where people from around the world go to make new lives, find themselves, or further their careers. A large number of these migrants are small-scale traders from Africa who deal in Chinese goods--often knockoffs or copies of high-end branded items--to send back to their home countries. In The World in Guangzhou, Gordon Mathews explores the question of how the city became a center of "low-end globalization" and shows what we can learn from that experience about similar transformations elsewhere in the world. Through detailed ethnographic portraits, Mathews reveals a world of globalization based on informality, reputation, and trust rather than on formal contracts. How, he asks, can such informal relationships emerge between two groups--Chinese and sub-Saharan Africans--that don't share a common language, culture, or religion? And what happens when Africans move beyond their status as temporary residents and begin to put down roots and establish families?" -- Publisher's description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
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305.800951275 MAT 012254 (Browse shelf) Available 012254

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- What this book is about -- Impressions of Guangzhou -- A brief history of foreigners in Guangzhou -- Foreign places in Guangzhou -- How this book's research was done -- Foreigners in Guangzhou -- "The Chinese dream": stories of eight foreigners -- Rich foreigner, poor foreigner -- Race and money -- Foreign communities: Japanese and Nigerians -- The power of rumor -- Foreigners' attitudes toward China and Chinese -- African-Chinese relations -- African traders in Guangzhou: an overview -- Business deception and cheating -- Quarrels between Africans and Chinese -- Chinese views of Africans -- African views of Chinese -- Low-end globalization -- Low-end globalization/high-end globalization -- How low-end globalization works: sourcing, money, copies, and customs -- Accounts of low-end globalization -- Low-end globalization's circuits -- Legal-illegal in Guangzhou -- Paths, legal and illegal -- Visa and passport worries, jail and deportation -- Police -- Accounts of overstayers and friends -- Logistics agents, middlemen, and cultural brokers -- Logistics agents -- Middleman -- Cultural brokers -- Accounts of logistics agents, middlemen, and cultural brokers -- Religion in a foreign world -- "I believe in god but Chinese believe in gold" -- Islam in comparison to Christianity -- Christian churches -- Accounts of religious seekers -- Religion: implications -- Romance, love, marriage, and families: a Chinese Barack Obama? -- "African Chinese" -- The travails of Chinese-African romantic relationships -- Children -- Accounts of marriages -- Conclusion: the larger significance of Africans in China.

"Only decades ago, the population of Guangzhou was almost wholly Chinese. Today, it is a truly global city, a place where people from around the world go to make new lives, find themselves, or further their careers. A large number of these migrants are small-scale traders from Africa who deal in Chinese goods--often knockoffs or copies of high-end branded items--to send back to their home countries. In The World in Guangzhou, Gordon Mathews explores the question of how the city became a center of "low-end globalization" and shows what we can learn from that experience about similar transformations elsewhere in the world. Through detailed ethnographic portraits, Mathews reveals a world of globalization based on informality, reputation, and trust rather than on formal contracts. How, he asks, can such informal relationships emerge between two groups--Chinese and sub-Saharan Africans--that don't share a common language, culture, or religion? And what happens when Africans move beyond their status as temporary residents and begin to put down roots and establish families?" -- Publisher's description.

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