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Environmental litigation in China : a study in political ambivalence / Rachel E. Stern.

By: Stern, Rachel E.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Cambridge studies in law and society.Cambridge [UK] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013Description: viii, 300 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781107020023 (hbk.).Subject(s): Environmental law -- China | Environmental law -- Political aspects -- China | Pollution -- Law and legislation -- China | Liability for environmental damages -- China | LAW / GeneralDDC classification: 344.51046 STE Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: 1. Post-Mao: economic growth, environmental protection, and the law; 2. From dispute to decision; 3. Frontiers of environmental law; 4. Political ambivalence: the state; 5. On the frontlines: the judges; 6. Heroes or troublemakers? The lawyers; 7. Soft support: the international NGOs; 8. Thinking about outcomes.
Summary: "This is a book about the improbable: seeking legal relief for pollution in contemporary China. In a country known for tight political control and ineffectual courts, Environmental Litigation in China unravels how everyday justice works: how judges make decisions, why lawyers take cases, and how international influence matters. It is a readable account of how the leadership's mixed signals and political ambivalence play out on the ground - propelling some, such as the village doctor who fought a chemical plant for more than a decade, even as others back away from risk. Yet this remarkable book shows that even in a country where expectations would be that law wouldn't much matter, environmental litigation provides a sliver of space for legal professionals to explore new roles and, in so doing, probe the boundary of what is politically possible"--Summary: "This is a book about the improbable: seeking legal relief for environmental pollution in contemporary China. It is a story involving judges, lawyers, and international groups as well as the individuals who file civil environmental lawsuits, people such as the village doctor who spent well over a decade suing a local chemical plant. The book offers a close-to-the-ground account of everyday justice and the factors that shape it. In a country known for tight political control and ineffectual courts, Environmental Litigation in China unravels how litigation works: how judges make decisions, why lawyers take cases and how international influence matters. Conceptually, the book illustrates how litigation can contribute to social change in China and, by implication, other authoritarian states. Even in a country where expectations would be that law wouldn't much matter, environmental litigation can provide a limited opportunity for legal professionals to explore new roles and, in so doing, probe the boundary of what is politically possible"--
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
344.51046 STE 011619 (Browse shelf) Available 011619

Includes bibliographical references (p. 247-286) and index.

Machine generated contents note: 1. Post-Mao: economic growth, environmental protection, and the law; 2. From dispute to decision; 3. Frontiers of environmental law; 4. Political ambivalence: the state; 5. On the frontlines: the judges; 6. Heroes or troublemakers? The lawyers; 7. Soft support: the international NGOs; 8. Thinking about outcomes.

"This is a book about the improbable: seeking legal relief for pollution in contemporary China. In a country known for tight political control and ineffectual courts, Environmental Litigation in China unravels how everyday justice works: how judges make decisions, why lawyers take cases, and how international influence matters. It is a readable account of how the leadership's mixed signals and political ambivalence play out on the ground - propelling some, such as the village doctor who fought a chemical plant for more than a decade, even as others back away from risk. Yet this remarkable book shows that even in a country where expectations would be that law wouldn't much matter, environmental litigation provides a sliver of space for legal professionals to explore new roles and, in so doing, probe the boundary of what is politically possible"--

"This is a book about the improbable: seeking legal relief for environmental pollution in contemporary China. It is a story involving judges, lawyers, and international groups as well as the individuals who file civil environmental lawsuits, people such as the village doctor who spent well over a decade suing a local chemical plant. The book offers a close-to-the-ground account of everyday justice and the factors that shape it. In a country known for tight political control and ineffectual courts, Environmental Litigation in China unravels how litigation works: how judges make decisions, why lawyers take cases and how international influence matters. Conceptually, the book illustrates how litigation can contribute to social change in China and, by implication, other authoritarian states. Even in a country where expectations would be that law wouldn't much matter, environmental litigation can provide a limited opportunity for legal professionals to explore new roles and, in so doing, probe the boundary of what is politically possible"--

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