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What makes a great city / Alexander Garvin.

By: Garvin, Alexander [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookCopyright date: Washington, D.C. : Island Press, 2016Description: xxvii, 312 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 23 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781610917582 (pbk.); 1610917588 (pbk.); 9781610917575 (hbk.); 161091757X (hbk.).Subject(s): Public spaces | City planning | City and town lifeDDC classification: 307.1216 GAR.V
Contents:
note: Defining the Public Realm -- Streets, Squares, and Parks -- Beyond Streets, Squares, and Parks -- Making Cities Great -- Open to Anybody -- Something for Everybody -- Attracting and Retaining Market Demand -- Providing a Framework for Successful Urbanization -- Sustaining a Habitable Environment -- Nurturing and Supporting a Civil Society -- Overwhelmingly Identifiable, Accessible, and Easy to Use -- Plaza Mayor, Salamanca, Spain -- Creating an Identifiable, Accessible, and Easy-to-Use Public Realm -- The Paris Metro -- Federal Center, Chicago -- Piazza del Campo, Siena, Italy -- The Squares of Savannah -- Sixteenth Street, Denver -- Keeping the Public Realm Safe -- Gran Via, Barcelona -- Piet Heinkade, Amsterdam -- The Streets of Paris -- Feeling Comfortable -- Jardin du Palais Royale, Paris -- Commonwealth Avenue, Boston -- Kungstradgarten, Stockholm -- Via dei Condotti, Rome -- Via Aquilante, Gubbio, Italy -- Worth Avenue, Palm Beach -- Levittown, Long Island -- Forever Welcoming -- A Reason to Return Again and Again -- Boulevard des Italiens, Paris -- Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris -- Washington Park, Chicago -- Having Fun -- Playgrounds -- Piazza Navona, Rome -- Animating a Multifunctional Public Realm -- Market Square and PPG Place, Pittsburgh -- A Place for Everything and Everything in Its Place -- Central Park, New York City -- Passeig de Gracia, Barcelona -- Reclaiming Bits of the Public Realm for Public Use -- Plenty of People -- Using the Public Realm to Trigger Private Development -- Place des Vosges, Paris -- The Revival of the Place des Vosges -- Regent's Park, London -- Avenue Foch, Paris -- Enlarging the Public Realm to Accommodate a Growing Market -- An Administrative Center for the Modern City of Paris -- North Michigan Avenue, Chicago -- Responding to Diminishing Market Demand by Repositioning the Public Realm -- Kärntner Straße, Vienna -- Bryant Park, New York City -- Continuing Investment -- Alternative Frameworks -- Atlanta -- Dubrovnik, Croatia -- Rome -- St. Petersburg, Russia -- The Paris Street Network -- Ringstrasse, Vienna -- Radio-Concentric Moscow -- Houston's Highway Rings -- The Manhattan Grid -- Maintaining the Public Realm Framework -- Thirty-Fourth Street, Manhattan -- Determining the Location of Market Activity -- What Does It Take to Sustain a Habitable Environment? -- Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn -- Using the Public Realm to Create a Habitable Environment -- Boston's Emerald Necklace -- Long Island's Network of Parks, Beaches, and Parkways -- Reconfiguring the Public Realm to Improve Habitability -- The Public Squares of Portland, Oregon -- New York City's Greenstreets Program -- Transportation Alternatives That Improve Habitability -- Union Square, San Francisco -- Post Office Square, Boston -- Congestion Pricing in London -- Congestion Targets in Zurich -- An Ever More Habitable Public Realm -- The Chicago Lakeshore -- Reviving the San Antonio River -- Operating the Public Realm -- Park Management in New York City -- An Ever-Improving Public Realm -- The Nurturing Role of the Public Realm -- The Streets of Copenhagen -- Palace Square (Dvortsovaya Ploshchad), St. Petersburg -- Red Square, Moscow -- Ensuring That the Public Realm Continues to Nurture a Civil Society -- Times Square, Manhattan -- The Public Realm as a Setting for Self-Expression -- Whose Realm Is It? -- Determining the Daily Life of a City -- The Squares of London -- The Minneapolis Park System -- The Madrid Miracle -- The Key to Greatness -- The Patient Search for a Better Tomorrow -- Place de la Republique, Paris -- Post Oak Boulevard in the Uptown District of Houston -- Brooklyn Bridge Park -- Atlanta's BeltLine Emerald Necklace -- Waterfront Toronto -- What Makes a City Great.
Summary: What makes a great city? Not a good city or a functional city but a great city. A city that people admire, learn from, and replicate. City planner and architect Alexander Garvin set out to answer this question by observing cities, largely in North America and Europe, with special attention to Paris, London, New York, and Vienna. For Garvin, greatness is not just about the most beautiful, convenient, or well-managed city; it isn?t even about any?city.? It is about what people who shape cities can do to make a city great. A great city is not an exquisite, completed artifact. It is a dynamic, constantly changing place that residents and their leaders can reshape to satisfy their demands. While this book does discuss the history, demographic composition, politics, economy, topography, history, layout, architecture, and planning of great cities, it is not about these aspects alone. Most importantly, it is about the interplay between people and public realm, and how they have interacted throughout history to create great cities. To open the book, Garvin explains that a great public realm attracts and retains the people who make a city great. He describes exactly what the term public realm means, its most important characteristics, as well as providing examples of when and how these characteristics work, or don?t. An entire chapter is devoted to a discussion of how particular components of the public realm (squares in London, parks in Minneapolis, and streets in Madrid) shape people?s daily lives. He concludes with a look at how twenty-first century initiatives in Paris, Houston, Atlanta, Brooklyn, and Toronto are making an already fine public realm even better?initiatives that demonstrate what other cities can do to improve. This volume will help readers understand that any city can be changed for the better and inspire entrepreneurs, public officials, and city residents to do it themselves.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
307.1216 GAR.V 011257 (Browse shelf) Available 011257

Includes bibliographical references and index.

note: Defining the Public Realm --
Streets, Squares, and Parks --
Beyond Streets, Squares, and Parks --
Making Cities Great --
Open to Anybody --
Something for Everybody --
Attracting and Retaining Market Demand --
Providing a Framework for Successful Urbanization --
Sustaining a Habitable Environment --
Nurturing and Supporting a Civil Society --
Overwhelmingly Identifiable, Accessible, and Easy to Use --
Plaza Mayor, Salamanca, Spain --
Creating an Identifiable, Accessible, and Easy-to-Use Public Realm --
The Paris Metro --
Federal Center, Chicago --
Piazza del Campo, Siena, Italy --
The Squares of Savannah --
Sixteenth Street, Denver --
Keeping the Public Realm Safe --
Gran Via, Barcelona --
Piet Heinkade, Amsterdam --
The Streets of Paris --
Feeling Comfortable --
Jardin du Palais Royale, Paris --
Commonwealth Avenue, Boston --
Kungstradgarten, Stockholm --
Via dei Condotti, Rome --
Via Aquilante, Gubbio, Italy --
Worth Avenue, Palm Beach --
Levittown, Long Island --
Forever Welcoming --
A Reason to Return Again and Again --
Boulevard des Italiens, Paris --
Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris --
Washington Park, Chicago --
Having Fun --
Playgrounds --
Piazza Navona, Rome --
Animating a Multifunctional Public Realm --
Market Square and PPG Place, Pittsburgh --
A Place for Everything and Everything in Its Place --
Central Park, New York City --
Passeig de Gracia, Barcelona --
Reclaiming Bits of the Public Realm for Public Use --
Plenty of People --
Using the Public Realm to Trigger Private Development --
Place des Vosges, Paris --
The Revival of the Place des Vosges --
Regent's Park, London --
Avenue Foch, Paris --
Enlarging the Public Realm to Accommodate a Growing Market --
An Administrative Center for the Modern City of Paris --
North Michigan Avenue, Chicago --
Responding to Diminishing Market Demand by Repositioning the Public Realm --
Kärntner Straße, Vienna --
Bryant Park, New York City --
Continuing Investment --
Alternative Frameworks --
Atlanta --
Dubrovnik, Croatia --
Rome --
St. Petersburg, Russia --
The Paris Street Network --
Ringstrasse, Vienna --
Radio-Concentric Moscow --
Houston's Highway Rings --
The Manhattan Grid --
Maintaining the Public Realm Framework --
Thirty-Fourth Street, Manhattan --
Determining the Location of Market Activity --
What Does It Take to Sustain a Habitable Environment? --
Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn --
Using the Public Realm to Create a Habitable Environment --
Boston's Emerald Necklace --
Long Island's Network of Parks, Beaches, and Parkways --
Reconfiguring the Public Realm to Improve Habitability --
The Public Squares of Portland, Oregon --
New York City's Greenstreets Program --
Transportation Alternatives That Improve Habitability --
Union Square, San Francisco --
Post Office Square, Boston --
Congestion Pricing in London --
Congestion Targets in Zurich --
An Ever More Habitable Public Realm --
The Chicago Lakeshore --
Reviving the San Antonio River --
Operating the Public Realm --
Park Management in New York City --
An Ever-Improving Public Realm --
The Nurturing Role of the Public Realm --
The Streets of Copenhagen --
Palace Square (Dvortsovaya Ploshchad), St. Petersburg --
Red Square, Moscow --
Ensuring That the Public Realm Continues to Nurture a Civil Society --
Times Square, Manhattan --
The Public Realm as a Setting for Self-Expression --
Whose Realm Is It? --
Determining the Daily Life of a City --
The Squares of London --
The Minneapolis Park System --
The Madrid Miracle --
The Key to Greatness --
The Patient Search for a Better Tomorrow --
Place de la Republique, Paris --
Post Oak Boulevard in the Uptown District of Houston --
Brooklyn Bridge Park --
Atlanta's BeltLine Emerald Necklace --
Waterfront Toronto --
What Makes a City Great.


What makes a great city? Not a good city or a functional city but a great city. A city that people admire, learn from, and replicate. City planner and architect Alexander Garvin set out to answer this question by observing cities, largely in North America and Europe, with special attention to Paris, London, New York, and Vienna. For Garvin, greatness is not just about the most beautiful, convenient, or well-managed city; it isn?t even about any?city.? It is about what people who shape cities can do to make a city great. A great city is not an exquisite, completed artifact. It is a dynamic, constantly changing place that residents and their leaders can reshape to satisfy their demands. While this book does discuss the history, demographic composition, politics, economy, topography, history, layout, architecture, and planning of great cities, it is not about these aspects alone. Most importantly, it is about the interplay between people and public realm, and how they have interacted throughout history to create great cities. To open the book, Garvin explains that a great public realm attracts and retains the people who make a city great. He describes exactly what the term public realm means, its most important characteristics, as well as providing examples of when and how these characteristics work, or don?t. An entire chapter is devoted to a discussion of how particular components of the public realm (squares in London, parks in Minneapolis, and streets in Madrid) shape people?s daily lives. He concludes with a look at how twenty-first century initiatives in Paris, Houston, Atlanta, Brooklyn, and Toronto are making an already fine public realm even better?initiatives that demonstrate what other cities can do to improve. This volume will help readers understand that any city can be changed for the better and inspire entrepreneurs, public officials, and city residents to do it themselves.

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