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OECD territorial reviews : Toronto, Canada 2009 / Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Contributor(s): Merk, Olaf | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookParis : OECD, c2009Description: 211 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9789264079403 (Thermal).Other title: Toronto, Canada 2009.Subject(s): 2000 - 2099 | Regional planning -- Ontario -- Toronto | Economic history | Economic policy | Regional planning | Social history | Toronto (Ont.) -- Economic conditions -- 21st century | Toronto (Ont.) -- Social conditions -- 21st century | Toronto (Ont.) -- Economic policy | Ontario -- TorontoGenre/Form: E-books.DDC classification: 338.9713 OEC Online resources: For full text click here Also available online.
Contents:
Assessment and recommendations -- Toronto : facing challenges, grasping opportunities -- Capitalising on competitive assets -- Improving competitiveness through better governance.
Summary: This publication finds that the Toronto region is one of the chief economic powerhouses of Canada, generating almost one-fifth of national GDP and 45% of Ontario's GDP. The region is home to 40% of Canada's business headquarters and is a main manufacturing hub, with major automotive, biomedical and electronics companies. Toronto is also one of the most diverse metropolitan regions in the world: half of its population is foreign born and it hosted 40% of all immigrants to Canada during 2001-2006. Nevertheless, the region's current economic development model is under pressure and its economic performance has been mixed in recent years. From 1995 to 2005, GDP per capita and GDP growth rates were below the Canadian average while its annual economic and labor productivity growth were lower than the average for OECD metropolitan regions. During this period, population growth boosted demand in the construction, sales and retail, professional and financial services sectors. However, the recent decline in the area's manufacturing jobs has illustrated the structural difficulties of some traditionally strong areas, such as the automotive and electronics industries. This review proposes a new sustainable competitiveness agenda to enhance productivity, focusing on innovation, cultural diversity and infrastructure, as well as on green policies. To implement such an agenda, the review proposes improving the current governance framework by intensifying strategic planning at the level of the Toronto region.--Publisher's description.
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"This Review was coordinated and drafted by Olaf Merk"--Acknowledgements.

"ISSN 1990-0767 (print)"--T.p. verso.

"ISSN 1990-0759 (online)"--T.p. verso.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-211).

Assessment and recommendations -- Toronto : facing challenges, grasping opportunities -- Capitalising on competitive assets -- Improving competitiveness through better governance.

This publication finds that the Toronto region is one of the chief economic powerhouses of Canada, generating almost one-fifth of national GDP and 45% of Ontario's GDP. The region is home to 40% of Canada's business headquarters and is a main manufacturing hub, with major automotive, biomedical and electronics companies. Toronto is also one of the most diverse metropolitan regions in the world: half of its population is foreign born and it hosted 40% of all immigrants to Canada during 2001-2006. Nevertheless, the region's current economic development model is under pressure and its economic performance has been mixed in recent years. From 1995 to 2005, GDP per capita and GDP growth rates were below the Canadian average while its annual economic and labor productivity growth were lower than the average for OECD metropolitan regions. During this period, population growth boosted demand in the construction, sales and retail, professional and financial services sectors. However, the recent decline in the area's manufacturing jobs has illustrated the structural difficulties of some traditionally strong areas, such as the automotive and electronics industries. This review proposes a new sustainable competitiveness agenda to enhance productivity, focusing on innovation, cultural diversity and infrastructure, as well as on green policies. To implement such an agenda, the review proposes improving the current governance framework by intensifying strategic planning at the level of the Toronto region.--Publisher's description.

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