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Handbook of coastal disaster mitigation for engineers and planners / Miguel Esteban, Hiroshi Takagi Vaiaku, Tomoya Shibayama Kashiwa-shi.

By: Esteban, Miguel.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Waltham, MA : Elsevier, 2015Edition: First edition.Description: xxx, 765 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780128010600 (pbk.).Subject(s): Ocean and civilization | Hazardous geographic environments -- Safety measures | Coastal engineering | Coastal zone management | Shore protection | Emergency managementDDC classification: 627.58 HAN Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
<p>Preface</​p> <p>Part One: Engineering Analysis of Recent Tsunami Events Part Two: Engineering Analysis of Recent Tropical Cyclone Events Part Three: Planning for Future Threats Part Four: Engineering Assessments of Vulnerability Part Five: Mitigation Measures Part Six: Post-Disaster Reconstruction Part Seven: Climate Change Influence on Coastal Disasters </​p> Machine generated contents note: pt. I Analysis of Recent Disasters 1.2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami 1.Introduction 2.Methodology and Description of Basic Tsunami Parameters 3.Surveys in Sri Lanka 4.Surveys in Banda Aceh, Indonesia 5.Discussion 6.Summary and Conclusions References 2.2005 Storm Surge by Hurricane Katrina 2.Survey Results of JSCE Team 3.Discussion and Conclusions 3.Observations and Numerical Simulation of Storm Surge due to Cyclone Sidr 2007 in Bangladesh 2.Case Study: Cyclone Sidr 3.Numerical Simulation 4.Results 5.Current State of Disaster Management Preparedness 6.Challenges in Disaster Mitigation 7.Conclusions 4.Storm Surge Due to 2008 Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar and Post-cyclone Preparedness Activities 2.Cyclone Nargis and Field Surveys Contents note continued: 5.Post Nargis Disaster Management Preparedness in Myanmar 6.Conclusions 5.Tsunami Disasters in Remote Islands: 2009 Samoan and 2010 Mentawai Islands Tsunamis 2.Field Survey of the 2009 Samoan Islands Tsunami 3.Field Survey of the 2010 Mentawai Islands Tsunami 4.Discussion 5.Conclusions Acknowledgements 6.Tsunami Resonance in the Bay of Concepcion (Chile) and the Effect of Future Events 2.The 2010 Chile Tsunami 3.Study Area 4.Natural Oscillation Modes 5.Numerical Simulation of Past Tsunamis 6.Effect of Possible Future Tsunamis Acknowledgments 7.Storm Surge in New York City Caused by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 2.Hurricane Sandy 3.Storm Surge Field Survey in New York City 4.Infrastructure Damage in New York City 5.New York City Response to Hurricane Sandy Contents note continued: References 8.Storm Surge Due to 2013 Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) in Leyte Gulf, the Philippines 2.Historical Tropical Cyclones and Typhoon Yolanda 3.Observation of Storm Surge Through Field Survey 4.Storm Surge Simulation pt. II Assessments of Vulnerability 9.Building Damage Assessment and Implications for Future Tsunami Fragility Estimations 2.Cause of Building Damage 3.Structural Fragility Assessment Methods 4.Tsunami Fragility Functions 5.Future Improvements and Applications 10.Tsunami Fatality Rate and Evacuation Behavior During the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami 2.Mitigation Investigation After the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami 3.Evacuation Behaviors During the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami 5.Conclusion Contents note continued: 11.The Emergence of Global Tsunami Awareness: Analysis of Disaster Preparedness in Chile, Indonesia, Japan, and Vietnam 2.Central Chile 3.Mentawai Islands, Indonesia 4.Tohoku, Japan 5.Central Vietnam: Emergence of Awareness in Countries Not Recently Affected By Tsunamis 6.Emergence of Global Tsunami Awareness 12.Coastal Disasters in Vietnam 2.Overview of Coastal Disasters and Climate Change in Vietnam 3.Tropical Cyclones 4.Storm Surges 5.Tsunami 6.Coastal Erosion 7.Floods and Sea-Level Rise in the Mekong Delta 8.Conclusions Acknowledgment 13.Estimation of the Current Risk to Human Damage Life Posed by Future Tsunamis in Japan 2.Influence of Tsunami Height and Arrival Time on Loss of Life Contents note continued: 3.Analysis of Prioritization of Tsunami Counter-measures in the South Kanto Region (Including Tokyo Bay) 4.Discussion of Possible Counter-Measures 14.A Study on the Probability of Tsunami Attacks in the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman 2.Tsunamis in the Persian Gulf 3.Tsunamis in Gulf of Oman 4.Concluding Remarks pt. III Mitigation Measures (Structural Measures) 15.Stability of Breakwaters Against Tsunami Attack 2.Breakwater Failures During Past Tsunami Events 3.Bearing Capacity Failure 4.Design of Armor Units Against Tsunami Attack 5.Design of Armor Units Against Tsunami Events 6.Sample Design 7.Discussion 16.Stability and Disaster Mitigation Effect of Wave-Dissipating Concrete Blocks of Detached Breakwaters Against Tsunami Waves 2.Hydraulic Model Tests Contents note continued: 3.Test Results and Discussions 4.Conclusions 17.Destruction of Coastal Structures after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami 2.Post Tsunami Field Surveys 3.Recommendation to Improve the Resilience of Structures to Future Tsunamis 18.Breakwater Damage and the Effect of Breakwaters on Mitigation of Inundation Extent During Tsunamis: Case Study of The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami 2.Analysis of Breakwater Failures due to the 2011 Tsunami 3.Effectiveness of Conventional Breakwaters in Reducing Tsunami Inundation 19.Mechanisms of Damage to Coastal Structures due to the 2011 Great East Japan Tsunami 1.Kamaishi Bay-Mouth Breakwater 2.Utatsu Highway Bridge 3.Concrete Road Bridge in Noda-Mura 4.Scour Contents note continued: 20.Post-Tsunami Engineering Forensics: Tsunami Impact on Infrastructure -Lessons from 2004 Indian Ocean, 2010 Chile, and 2011 Tohoku Japan Tsunami Field Surveys 2.Basic Tsunami Transformation and Tsunami-Induced Force Characteristics 3.Tsunami Forensic Field Investigations 4.Tsunami Forensic Field Investigations: Lessons Learned 5.Tsunami Design Guidelines for Structures: A Brief Review 21.The ASCE 7 Tsunami Loads and Effects Design Standard for the United States 2.General Requirements 3.Definitions 4.Tsunami Risk Categories 5.Analysis of Design Inundation Depth and Velocity 6.Inundation Depths and Flow Velocities Based on Run-Up 7.Inundation Depth and Flow Velocities Based on Site-Specific PTHA 8.Structural Design Procedure for Tsunami Effects 9.Hydrostatic Loads 10.Hydrodynamic Loads 11.Debris Impact Loads Contents note continued: 12.Foundation Design 13.Structural Countermeasures for Tsunami Loading 14.Tsunami Vertical Evacuation Refuge Structures 15.Designated Nonstructural Components and Systems 16.Non-Building Structures 17.Conclusions 22.The New ASCE Tsunami Design Standard Applied to Mitigate Tohoku Tsunami Building Structural Failure Mechanisms 2.Proposed ASCE 7 Tsunami Loads and Effects Design Provisions 3.Comparison of Tsunami Loads with Seismic Loads on Generic Structures 4.Comparison of Observed Performance of Structures During the Tohoku Tsunami Compared to Design Performance Calculated Using the ASCE 7 Standard 23.Disturbance of Port Operations Due to Long-Period Waves and Countermeasures Using Submerged Mound Structures 2.Wave Absorbing Properties 3.Stability Against Wave Overtopping 4.Design Example pt. IV Mitigation Measures (Soft Measures) 24.Wave Reduction in Mangrove Forests: General Information and Case Study in Thailand 2.Basic Knowledge of Mangrove Forests 3.Mechanism of Wave Reduction in Mangrove Forests 4.Research on the Reduction of Wave Energy in Mangrove Forests 5.Wave Reduction Potential of Mangrove Forests 6.Factors Affecting Wave Reduction in Mangrove Forests 7.Deterioration and Efforts Regarding Mangrove Restoration in Thailand 8.Recommendation for Further Research into the Wave Reduction Potential of Mangrove Forests 9.Conclusions 25.Cost-Efficient Design of Multilayer Safety Systems Against Large-Scale Coastal Disasters 2.Case Study Description 3.Multi-Layer Safety in a Cost-Benefit Perspective 4.Ground Elevation 5.Investment Cost Functions 6.Frequency of Tsunami Water Levels 7.Loss Functions Contents note continued: 8.Optimal Multi-Layer Safety Design 9.Discussion 10.Conclusion 26.Coastal Erosion and Demonstration Project as Coastal Adaptation Measures in Mauritius 2.Coastal Issues in Mauritius 3.Demonstration Project: Gravel Beach 4.Public Participation in Beach Control and Maintenance pt. V Post-Disaster Reconstruction 27.Reconstruction from the Indian Ocean Tsunami Disaster: Case Study of Indonesia and Sri Lanka and the Philosophy of "Build Back Better" 2.Summary of the Indian Ocean Tsunami Disaster -Indonesia and Sri Lanka 3."Build Back Better" Concept in Tsunami Reconstruction 4.Urban Reconstruction 5.Housing Relocation 6.Organizational Arrangement for Reconstruction and Disaster Risk Reduction After the Disaster Contents note continued: 28.Tsunami Signs, Memorials and Evacuation Drills in Miyagi Prefecture After the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami 2.The 2011 Tsunami Signs 3.The 2011 Tsunami Memorials 4.Evacuation Drills 29.Reconstruction Following the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami: Case Study of Otsuchi Town in Iwate Prefecture, Japan 2.Otsuchi Town Before and Right After the Tohoku-Oki Earthquake and Tsunami 3.Reconstruction and Recovery Plans in Iwate Prefecture 4.Sustainability Issues pt. VI Climate Change Influence on Coastal Disasters 30.Stochastic Design of Caisson Breakwaters: Lessons from Past Failures and Coping with Climate Change 2.Methodology 3.Application to Actual Breakwaters 4.Stability of Breakwaters Under Climate Change 5.Failure Estimation Tables for Practicing Engineers Contents note continued: 6.Conclusion Appendix A Fourth-Order Approximation of Standing Waves Appendix B Expected Sliding Distance (ESD) and Expected Frequency Exceeding of a Critical Load (EFEC) for a Total of 360 Caisson Dimensions 31.Stability of Shallow Rubble Mound Breakwaters under Climate Change Induced Sea Level Rise 2.Breakwaters in the World 3.Methodology 5.Case Study in Vietnam 6.Discussion 32.Considering Sea Level Change When Designing Marine Civil Works: Recommendations for Best Practices 2.Sea Level Change 3.Toward a New Process for the Resilient Design 4.Conclusion 33.Adaptation to Sea Level Rise in Tokyo Bay: Opportunities for a Storm Surge Barrier? 3.Storm Surge Model Results 4.Economic Damage of Flooding Contents note continued: 5.Adaptation Options and Costs References.
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Book Book Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore
627.58 HAN 010107 (Browse shelf) Available 010107

Preface

Part One: Engineering Analysis of Recent Tsunami Events Part Two: Engineering Analysis of Recent Tropical Cyclone Events Part Three: Planning for Future Threats Part Four: Engineering Assessments of Vulnerability Part Five: Mitigation Measures Part Six: Post-Disaster Reconstruction Part Seven: Climate Change Influence on Coastal Disasters
Machine generated contents note: pt. I Analysis of Recent Disasters
1.2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami
1.Introduction
2.Methodology and Description of Basic Tsunami Parameters
3.Surveys in Sri Lanka
4.Surveys in Banda Aceh, Indonesia
5.Discussion
6.Summary and Conclusions
References
2.2005 Storm Surge by Hurricane Katrina
2.Survey Results of JSCE Team
3.Discussion and Conclusions
3.Observations and Numerical Simulation of Storm Surge due to Cyclone Sidr 2007 in Bangladesh
2.Case Study: Cyclone Sidr
3.Numerical Simulation
4.Results
5.Current State of Disaster Management Preparedness
6.Challenges in Disaster Mitigation
7.Conclusions
4.Storm Surge Due to 2008 Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar and Post-cyclone Preparedness Activities
2.Cyclone Nargis and Field Surveys
Contents note continued: 5.Post Nargis Disaster Management Preparedness in Myanmar
6.Conclusions
5.Tsunami Disasters in Remote Islands: 2009 Samoan and 2010 Mentawai Islands Tsunamis
2.Field Survey of the 2009 Samoan Islands Tsunami
3.Field Survey of the 2010 Mentawai Islands Tsunami
4.Discussion
5.Conclusions
Acknowledgements
6.Tsunami Resonance in the Bay of Concepcion (Chile) and the Effect of Future Events
2.The 2010 Chile Tsunami
3.Study Area
4.Natural Oscillation Modes
5.Numerical Simulation of Past Tsunamis
6.Effect of Possible Future Tsunamis
Acknowledgments
7.Storm Surge in New York City Caused by Hurricane Sandy in 2012
2.Hurricane Sandy
3.Storm Surge Field Survey in New York City
4.Infrastructure Damage in New York City
5.New York City Response to Hurricane Sandy
Contents note continued: References
8.Storm Surge Due to 2013 Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) in Leyte Gulf, the Philippines
2.Historical Tropical Cyclones and Typhoon Yolanda
3.Observation of Storm Surge Through Field Survey
4.Storm Surge Simulation
pt. II Assessments of Vulnerability
9.Building Damage Assessment and Implications for Future Tsunami Fragility Estimations
2.Cause of Building Damage
3.Structural Fragility Assessment Methods
4.Tsunami Fragility Functions
5.Future Improvements and Applications
10.Tsunami Fatality Rate and Evacuation Behavior During the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami
2.Mitigation Investigation After the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami
3.Evacuation Behaviors During the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami
5.Conclusion
Contents note continued: 11.The Emergence of Global Tsunami Awareness: Analysis of Disaster Preparedness in Chile, Indonesia, Japan, and Vietnam
2.Central Chile
3.Mentawai Islands, Indonesia
4.Tohoku, Japan
5.Central Vietnam: Emergence of Awareness in Countries Not Recently Affected By Tsunamis
6.Emergence of Global Tsunami Awareness
12.Coastal Disasters in Vietnam
2.Overview of Coastal Disasters and Climate Change in Vietnam
3.Tropical Cyclones
4.Storm Surges
5.Tsunami
6.Coastal Erosion
7.Floods and Sea-Level Rise in the Mekong Delta
8.Conclusions
Acknowledgment
13.Estimation of the Current Risk to Human Damage Life Posed by Future Tsunamis in Japan
2.Influence of Tsunami Height and Arrival Time on Loss of Life
Contents note continued: 3.Analysis of Prioritization of Tsunami Counter-measures in the South Kanto Region (Including Tokyo Bay)
4.Discussion of Possible Counter-Measures
14.A Study on the Probability of Tsunami Attacks in the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman
2.Tsunamis in the Persian Gulf
3.Tsunamis in Gulf of Oman
4.Concluding Remarks
pt. III Mitigation Measures (Structural Measures)
15.Stability of Breakwaters Against Tsunami Attack
2.Breakwater Failures During Past Tsunami Events
3.Bearing Capacity Failure
4.Design of Armor Units Against Tsunami Attack
5.Design of Armor Units Against Tsunami Events
6.Sample Design
7.Discussion
16.Stability and Disaster Mitigation Effect of Wave-Dissipating Concrete Blocks of Detached Breakwaters Against Tsunami Waves
2.Hydraulic Model Tests
Contents note continued: 3.Test Results and Discussions
4.Conclusions
17.Destruction of Coastal Structures after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami
2.Post Tsunami Field Surveys
3.Recommendation to Improve the Resilience of Structures to Future Tsunamis
18.Breakwater Damage and the Effect of Breakwaters on Mitigation of Inundation Extent During Tsunamis: Case Study of The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami
2.Analysis of Breakwater Failures due to the 2011 Tsunami
3.Effectiveness of Conventional Breakwaters in Reducing Tsunami Inundation
19.Mechanisms of Damage to Coastal Structures due to the 2011 Great East Japan Tsunami
1.Kamaishi Bay-Mouth Breakwater
2.Utatsu Highway Bridge
3.Concrete Road Bridge in Noda-Mura
4.Scour
Contents note continued: 20.Post-Tsunami Engineering Forensics: Tsunami Impact on Infrastructure
-Lessons from 2004 Indian Ocean, 2010 Chile, and 2011 Tohoku Japan Tsunami Field Surveys
2.Basic Tsunami Transformation and Tsunami-Induced Force Characteristics
3.Tsunami Forensic Field Investigations
4.Tsunami Forensic Field Investigations: Lessons Learned
5.Tsunami Design Guidelines for Structures: A Brief Review
21.The ASCE 7 Tsunami Loads and Effects Design Standard for the United States
2.General Requirements
3.Definitions
4.Tsunami Risk Categories
5.Analysis of Design Inundation Depth and Velocity
6.Inundation Depths and Flow Velocities Based on Run-Up
7.Inundation Depth and Flow Velocities Based on Site-Specific PTHA
8.Structural Design Procedure for Tsunami Effects
9.Hydrostatic Loads
10.Hydrodynamic Loads
11.Debris Impact Loads
Contents note continued: 12.Foundation Design
13.Structural Countermeasures for Tsunami Loading
14.Tsunami Vertical Evacuation Refuge Structures
15.Designated Nonstructural Components and Systems
16.Non-Building Structures
17.Conclusions
22.The New ASCE Tsunami Design Standard Applied to Mitigate Tohoku Tsunami Building Structural Failure Mechanisms
2.Proposed ASCE 7 Tsunami Loads and Effects Design Provisions
3.Comparison of Tsunami Loads with Seismic Loads on Generic Structures
4.Comparison of Observed Performance of Structures During the Tohoku Tsunami Compared to Design Performance Calculated Using the ASCE 7 Standard
23.Disturbance of Port Operations Due to Long-Period Waves and Countermeasures Using Submerged Mound Structures
2.Wave Absorbing Properties
3.Stability Against Wave Overtopping
4.Design Example
pt. IV Mitigation Measures (Soft Measures)
24.Wave Reduction in Mangrove Forests: General Information and Case Study in Thailand
2.Basic Knowledge of Mangrove Forests
3.Mechanism of Wave Reduction in Mangrove Forests
4.Research on the Reduction of Wave Energy in Mangrove Forests
5.Wave Reduction Potential of Mangrove Forests
6.Factors Affecting Wave Reduction in Mangrove Forests
7.Deterioration and Efforts Regarding Mangrove Restoration in Thailand
8.Recommendation for Further Research into the Wave Reduction Potential of Mangrove Forests
9.Conclusions
25.Cost-Efficient Design of Multilayer Safety Systems Against Large-Scale Coastal Disasters
2.Case Study Description
3.Multi-Layer Safety in a Cost-Benefit Perspective
4.Ground Elevation
5.Investment Cost Functions
6.Frequency of Tsunami Water Levels
7.Loss Functions
Contents note continued: 8.Optimal Multi-Layer Safety Design
9.Discussion
10.Conclusion
26.Coastal Erosion and Demonstration Project as Coastal Adaptation Measures in Mauritius
2.Coastal Issues in Mauritius
3.Demonstration Project: Gravel Beach
4.Public Participation in Beach Control and Maintenance
pt. V Post-Disaster Reconstruction
27.Reconstruction from the Indian Ocean Tsunami Disaster: Case Study of Indonesia and Sri Lanka and the Philosophy of "Build Back Better"
2.Summary of the Indian Ocean Tsunami Disaster
-Indonesia and Sri Lanka
3."Build Back Better" Concept in Tsunami Reconstruction
4.Urban Reconstruction
5.Housing Relocation
6.Organizational Arrangement for Reconstruction and Disaster Risk Reduction After the Disaster
Contents note continued: 28.Tsunami Signs, Memorials and Evacuation Drills in Miyagi Prefecture After the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami
2.The 2011 Tsunami Signs
3.The 2011 Tsunami Memorials
4.Evacuation Drills
29.Reconstruction Following the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami: Case Study of Otsuchi Town in Iwate Prefecture, Japan
2.Otsuchi Town Before and Right After the Tohoku-Oki Earthquake and Tsunami
3.Reconstruction and Recovery Plans in Iwate Prefecture
4.Sustainability Issues
pt. VI Climate Change Influence on Coastal Disasters
30.Stochastic Design of Caisson Breakwaters: Lessons from Past Failures and Coping with Climate Change
2.Methodology
3.Application to Actual Breakwaters
4.Stability of Breakwaters Under Climate Change
5.Failure Estimation Tables for Practicing Engineers
Contents note continued: 6.Conclusion
Appendix A Fourth-Order Approximation of Standing Waves
Appendix B Expected Sliding Distance (ESD) and Expected Frequency Exceeding of a Critical Load (EFEC) for a Total of 360 Caisson Dimensions
31.Stability of Shallow Rubble Mound Breakwaters under Climate Change Induced Sea Level Rise
2.Breakwaters in the World
3.Methodology
5.Case Study in Vietnam
6.Discussion
32.Considering Sea Level Change When Designing Marine Civil Works: Recommendations for Best Practices
2.Sea Level Change
3.Toward a New Process for the Resilient Design
4.Conclusion
33.Adaptation to Sea Level Rise in Tokyo Bay: Opportunities for a Storm Surge Barrier?
3.Storm Surge Model Results
4.Economic Damage of Flooding
Contents note continued: 5.Adaptation Options and Costs
References.

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